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01.12.2016 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2016 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2016

Access to mass media messages, and use of family planning in Nigeria: a spatio-demographic analysis from the 2013 DHS

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2016
Autoren:
Chukwuedozie K. Ajaero, Clifford Odimegwu, Ijeoma D. Ajaero, Chidiebere A. Nwachukwu
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interest.

Authors’ contributions

CKA conceived the study while IDA and CAN drafted the background of the study and helped in proof reading the manuscript. CON and CKA drafted the methodology and carried out data analysis. Finally, CKA compiled and discussed the results of the analysis. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Nigeria has the highest population in sub-Saharan Africa with high birth and growth rates. There is therefore need for family planning to regulate and stabilize this population. This study examined the relationship between access to mass media messages on family planning and use of family planning in Nigeria. It also investigated the impacts of spatio-demographic variables on the relationship between access to mass media messages and use of family planning.

Methods

Data from the 2013 demographic and health survey of Nigeria which was conducted in all the 36 states of Nigeria, and Abuja were used for the study. The sample was weighted to ensure representativeness. Univariate, bivariate and binary logistic regressions were conducted. The relationship between each of the access to mass media messages, and the family planning variables were determined with Pearson correlation analysis.

Results

The correlation results showed significant but weak direct relationships between the access to mass media messages and use of family planning at p < 0.0001 with access to television messages (r = 0.239) being associated with highest use of family planning. Some of the results of the adjusted regression analysis showed that access to television messages (OR = 1.2.225; p < 0.0001), and radio messages (OR = 1.945; p < 0.0001) increase the likelihood of the use of family planning. The adjusted regression model also indicated increased likelihood in the use of family planning by respondents with secondary education (OR = 2.709; p < 0.0001), the married (OR = 1.274; p < 0.001), and respondents within the highest wealth quintiles (OR = 3.442; p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

There exist significant variations within spatio-demographic groups with regards to having access to mass media messages on family planning, and on the use of family planning. The results showed that access to mass media messages increases the likelihood of the use of family planning. Also people with higher socioeconomic status and those from the Southern part of the country make more use of family planning. There is need to improve the socioeconomic status of the populations. Also, the quality and regularity of mass media messages should be improved, while other communication avenues such as traditional institutions, blogs, and seminars for youths should be used to make family planning messages more acceptable.
Literatur
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Reviewer Acknowledgement

Reviewer acknowledgement 2015