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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2016 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2016

An ecological analysis of food outlet density and prevalence of type II diabetes in South Carolina counties

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2016
Autoren:
Dana M. AlHasan, Jan Marie Eberth
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​s12889-015-2681-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

DMA performed the statistical analysis and drafted the manuscript. JME made substantial contributions to the design of the study and revised the manuscript critically. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Studies suggest that the built environment with high numbers of fast food restaurants and convenience stores and low numbers of super stores and grocery stores are related to obesity, type II diabetes mellitus, and other chronic diseases. Since few studies assess these relationships at the county level, we aim to examine fast food restaurant density, convenience store density, super store density, and grocery store density and prevalence of type II diabetes among counties in South Carolina.

Methods

Pearson’s correlation between four types of food outlet densities- fast food restaurants, convenience stores, super stores, and grocery stores- and prevalence of type II diabetes were computed. The relationship between each of these food outlet densities were mapped with prevalence of type II diabetes, and OLS regression analysis was completed adjusting for county-level rates of obesity, physical inactivity, density of recreation facilities, unemployment, households with no car and limited access to stores, education, and race.

Results

We showed a significant, negative relationship between fast food restaurant density and prevalence of type II diabetes, and a significant, positive relationship between convenience store density and prevalence of type II diabetes. In adjusted analysis, the food outlet densities (of any type) was not associated with prevalence of type II diabetes.

Conclusions

This ecological analysis showed no associations between fast food restaurants, convenience stores, super stores, or grocery stores densities and the prevalence of type II diabetes. Consideration of environmental, social, and cultural determinants, as well as individual behaviors is needed in future research.
Zusatzmaterial
Additional file 1: Study Variables’ Data Sources. (DOC 35 kb)
12889_2015_2681_MOESM1_ESM.doc
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