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01.12.2012 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

BMC Health Services Research 1/2012

An injury awareness education program on outcomes of juvenile justice offenders in Western Australia: an economic analysis

Zeitschrift:
BMC Health Services Research > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Kwok M Ho, Elizabeth Geelhoed, Monica Gope, Maxine Burrell, Sudhakar Rao
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1472-6963-12-279) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests'.

Authors’ contributions

KMH initiated the study, analyzed the data and drafted the manuscript. EG was responsible for analyzing and interpreting the economic data. MG initiated the idea of the P.A.R.T.Y. education program at Royal Perth Hospital and interpreted the data. MB was responsible for collecting the outcome data and interpreting the data. SR was responsible for initiating the P.A.R.T.Y. education program and interpreting the data. All authors agreed with the final version of the manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity of young people and the cost-effectiveness of many injury prevention programs remains uncertain. This study aimed to analyze the costs and benefits of an injury awareness education program, the P.A.R.T.Y. (Prevent Alcohol and Risk-related Trauma in Youth) program, for juvenile justice offenders in Western Australia.

Methods

Costs and benefits analysis based on effectiveness data from a linked-data cohort study on 225 juvenile justice offenders who were referred to the education program and 3434 who were not referred to the program between 2006 and 2011.

Results

During the study period, there were 8869 hospitalizations and 113 deaths due to violence or traffic-related injuries among those aged between 14 and 21 in Western Australia. The mean length of hospital stay was 4.6 days, a total of 320 patients (3.6%) needed an intensive care admission with an average length of stay of 6 days. The annual cost saved due to serious injury was $3,765 and the annual net cost of running this program was $33,735. The estimated cost per offence prevented, cost per serious injury avoided, and cost per undiscounted and discounted life year gained were $3,124, $42,169, $8,268 and $17,910, respectively. Increasing the frequency of the program from once per month to once per week would increase its cost-effectiveness substantially.

Conclusions

The P.A.R.T.Y. injury education program involving real-life trauma scenarios was cost-effective in reducing subsequent risk of committing violence or traffic-related offences, injuries, and death for juvenile justice offenders in Western Australia.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
12913_2012_2154_MOESM1_ESM.tiff
Authors’ original file for figure 2
12913_2012_2154_MOESM2_ESM.tiff
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