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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

Approaches used by parents to keep their children safe at home: a qualitative study to explore the perspectives of parents with children aged under five years

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Joanne Ablewhite, Lisa McDaid, Adrian Hawkins, Isabel Peel, Trudy Goodenough, Toity Deave, Jane Stewart, Michael Watson, Denise Kendrick
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

JA contributed to study design, the collection and interpretation of data and drafted the paper. LM collected data, contributed to interpretation of the data and to drafting the paper. AH collected data, contributed to interpretation of the data and to drafting the paper. IP contributed to interpretation of the data and to drafting the paper. TG collected data, contributed to the interpretation of data and drafting the paper. TD collected data, contributed to the interpretation of data and drafting the paper. JS contributed to the study design, to interpretation of data and to drafting the paper.MW contributed to drafting the paper. DK had the original idea for the study, designed the study, supervised data collection and data analysis and helped draft the paper. All authors agreed the final version of the paper.

Abstract

Background

Childhood unintentional injury represents an important global health problem. Many unintentional injuries experienced by children aged under 5 years occur within the home and are preventable. The aim of this study was to explore the approaches used by parents of children under five in order to help prevent unintentional injuries in the home and the factors which influence their use. Understanding how parents approach risk-management in the home has important implications for injury practitioners.

Methods

A multi-centre qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. A thematic approach was used to analyse the data. Sixty five parents of children aged under 5 years, from four study areas were interviewed: Bristol, Newcastle, Norwich and Nottingham.

Results

Three main injury prevention strategies used by parents were: a) Environmental such as removal of hazards, and use of safety equipment; b) parental supervision; and c) teaching, for example, teaching children about safety and use of rules and routine. Strategies were often used in combination due to their individual limitations. Parental assessment of injury risk, use of strategy and perceived effectiveness were fluid processes dependent on a child’s character, developmental age and the prior experiences of both parent and child. Some parents were more proactive in their approach to home safety while others only reacted if their child demonstrated an interest in a particular object or activity perceived as being an injury risk.

Conclusion

Parents’ injury prevention practices encompass a range of strategies that are fluid in line with the child’s age and stage of development; however, parents report that they still find it challenging to decide which strategy to use and when.
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