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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

Associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in adolescent girls and boys – family linkage data from the HUNT study

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Jannike Kaasbøll, Ingunn Ranøyen, Wendy Nilsen, Stian Lydersen, Marit S. Indredavik
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

JK. drafted the manuscript, participated in the design and interpretation of the data, and performed the statistical analyses; IR., SL, and MSI participated in the design and interpretation of the data and helped with performing the statistical analyses and drafting the manuscript; WN assisted with interpreting the data and drafting and editing the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Parental chronic pain has been associated with adverse outcomes in offspring. However, knowledge on individual and family resilience factors in adolescent offspring of chronic pain sufferers is scarce. This study thus aimed to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion levels reported by adolescent girls and boys.

Methods

Based on cross-sectional surveys from the Nord Trøndelag Health Study (the HUNT 3 study), the study used independent self-reports from adolescents aged 13 to 18 years (n = 3227) and their parents and conducted separate linear regression analyses for girls and boys.

Results

Concurrent maternal and paternal chronic pain was associated with reduced self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in girls. Moreover, maternal chronic pain was associated with higher social competence in boys and reduced self-esteem in girls. The majority of the observed associations were significantly different between girls and boys. Paternal chronic pain was not found to be associated with child outcomes.

Conclusions

The findings indicate that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain could be a potential risk factor for lower levels of individual and family resilience factors reported by girls. Further research on the relationship between parental pain and sex-specific offspring characteristics, including positive resilience factors, is warranted. The study demonstrates the importance of targeting the entire family in chronic pain care.
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