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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

Associations between the prevalence of influenza vaccination and patient’s knowledge about antibiotics

A cross-sectional study in the framework of the APRES-project in Austria

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Kathryn Hoffmann, Evelien ME van Bijnen, Aaron George, Ruth Kutalek, Elena Jirovsky, Silvia Wojczewski, Manfred Maier
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​s12889-015-2297-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

KH has made substantial contributions to the data collection process as well as to the conception, design, analysis, and interpretation of data. She drafted and revised the manuscript, gave the final approval of the version to be published, and is the corresponding author. EMEvB has made contributions to the data collection process as well as to the interpretation of the data, she revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content, and gave the final approval of the version to be published. AG has made contributions to the interpretation of the data, revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content, edited the manuscript as native speaker regarding English language, and gave the final approval of the version to be published. RK has made contributions to the interpretation of the data, revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content, and gave the final approval of the version to be published. EJ has made contributions to the interpretation of the data, revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content, and gave the final approval of the version to be published. SW has made contributions to the interpretation of the data, revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content, and gave the final approval of the version to be published. MM has made contributions to the interpretation of the data, revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content, and gave the final approval of the version to be published.

Authors’ information

Not applicable.

Availability of data and materials

Not applicable.

Abstract

Background

This study aimed to identify associations between GP patient’s knowledge about the spectrum of effectiveness of antibiotics and the probability of vaccination against influenza. The underlying hypothesis was that individuals with an understanding that antibiotics are ineffective against viruses, common colds, and flu were more likely to be vaccinated than persons lacking this knowledge.

Methods

This cross-sectional study was conducted within the context of the European APRES project in Austria. Between November 2010 and July 2011, patients were recruited from GP practices to complete questionnaires about their knowledge about antibiotics and their influenza vaccination status. Statistical analyses included subgroup analyses and logistic regression models.

Results

Data of 3224 patients was analyzed, demonstrating that patients with better knowledge concerning antibiotics had a significantly higher likelihood of being vaccinated (OR 1.35, CI 95 % 1.18–1.54). While the overall vaccination rate was low (18.6 % in 2009/2010 and 14.0 % in 2010/2011), elderly compared to younger adults (OR 0.06 CI 95 % 0.03–0.13) and healthcare workers (OR 2.24, CI 95 % 1.42–3.54) demonstrated higher likelihood of vaccination. Additionally, female GPs had significantly more vaccinated patients than male GPs (OR 2.90, CI 95 % 1.32–6.40).

Discussion

There has been little prior study on the association between a patient’s knowledge of the effectiveness spectrum of antibiotics and influenza vaccination status. Given the public health imperative to increase annual prevalence of influenza vaccination, understanding this educational gap can improve specificity in counseling as well as vaccination rates. Ultimately, we found that those with a better knowledge on about antibiotics had a significantly higher likelihood of being vaccinated.

Conclusions

The results of this study demonstrate that vaccination prevalence is associated with patient’s knowledge about antibiotics. It can be concluded that one strategy to improve the overall low vaccination rates for seasonal influenza in Austria would be, particularly for male GPs, to have a specific discussion with patients about these circumstances by focusing on younger patients. Further, public health efforts could supplement in-office strategies to improve this area of health literacy.
Zusatzmaterial
Additional file 1: Crude results of the logistic regression model for all variables separately regarding associations with a positive seasonal influenza two year vaccination status. (DOCX 13 kb)
12889_2015_2297_MOESM1_ESM.docx
Additional file 2: Influenza vaccination status in detail (yes, no, don’t know, no/don’t know) by AB knowledge score. (DOCX 15 kb)
12889_2015_2297_MOESM2_ESM.docx
Additional file 3: Crude regression model for the association of the AB knowledge score with the likelihood to be vaccinated in both years surveyed (only “yes” and “no” answers regarding vaccination status were taken into account, “don’t know” answers were excluded). (DOCX 11 kb)
12889_2015_2297_MOESM3_ESM.docx
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