Skip to main content
main-content

19.04.2019 | Ausgabe 6/2019

Journal of Behavioral Medicine 6/2019

Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety: a secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression

Zeitschrift:
Journal of Behavioral Medicine > Ausgabe 6/2019
Autoren:
Anao Zhang, Lindsay A. Borhneimer, Addie Weaver, Cynthia Franklin, Audrey Hang Hai, Samantha Guz, Li Shen
Wichtige Hinweise
A correction to this article is available online at https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10865-019-00132-2.

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is well supported for treating depressive and anxiety disorders. Trials of CBT for anxiety and depression in primary care have increased over the past decade, yet only one meta-analysis, published in 2015, examined this topic and the scope of that review is relatively narrow. This study conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of primary care based CBT for depression and anxiety. A search of seven electronic databases, six professional websites, and reference lists from articles meeting inclusion criteria was conducted for studies published between 1900 and November 2018. Fifty-seven eligible studies (including 10,701 participants; 221 effect sizes) of randomized controlled trials were eligible and included for meta-analysis using robust variance estimation in meta-regression. Outcome indicators were depression and anxiety measures. An overall significant treatment effect, d = 0.400, 95% CI (0.235, 0.566), p < 0.001, of CBT for depression and anxiety disorders in primary care was identified. Subgroup analyses indicated significant treatment effect for: (1) depressive (d = 0.425, p < 0.001) and anxiety (d = 0.393, p < 0.01) outcomes, (2) studies conducted inside primary care (d = 0.412, p < 0.001), (3) studies using individual-based CBT (d = 0.412, p < 0.001), (4) studies without primary care physician involvement (d = 0.395, p < 0.001), and (5) studies using both tele-health (d = 0.563, p < 0.001) and in-person CBT (d = 0.363, p < 0.001). The percentage of White participants, treatment composition (CBT only versus CBT + other approaches), and treatment duration were significant moderators. Implications for clinical practice are discussed based on both moderator and subgroup analysis results.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

★ PREMIUM-INHALT
e.Med Interdisziplinär

Mit e.Med Interdisziplinär erhalten Sie Zugang zu allen CME-Fortbildungen und Fachzeitschriften auf SpringerMedizin.de. Zusätzlich können Sie eine Zeitschrift Ihrer Wahl in gedruckter Form beziehen – ohne Aufpreis.

Jetzt e.Med bestellen und 100 € sparen!

Weitere Produktempfehlungen anzeigen
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 6/2019

Journal of Behavioral Medicine 6/2019 Zur Ausgabe
  1. Sie können e.Med Neurologie & Psychiatrie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  2. Sie können e.Med Neurologie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  3. Sie können e.Med Psychiatrie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.