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01.12.2017 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2017 Open Access

Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation 1/2017

Costs and savings associated with a pharmacists prescribing for minor ailments program in Saskatchewan

Zeitschrift:
Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation > Ausgabe 1/2017
Autoren:
Ellen Rafferty, Mohsen Yaghoubi, Jeff Taylor, Marwa Farag
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​s12962-017-0066-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Ellen Rafferty and Mohsen Yaghoubi contributed equally to this work
Jeff Taylor and Marwa Farag were co-principal investigators
The Letter to the Editor to this article has been published in Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation 2018 16:62
The Letter to the Editor to this article has been published in Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation 2018 16:57

Abstract

Background

Health care systems around the world have started to develop pharmacists prescribing for minor ailments (PPMA) programs. These programs aim to improve the efficiency of care, reduce physician visits, and increase the accessibility to prescription medication (Rx). This study performed an economic impact analysis of the pharmacists prescribing for minor ailments program in Saskatchewan.

Methods

We measured costs for the program and the alternative scenario (i.e. no PPMA program) from a public payer and societal perspective, using primary data on pharmacists prescribing consultations in Saskatchewan. Furthermore, we calculated public payer and societal savings, and return on investment ratios for the program, as well as projecting the costs and benefits over the next 5 years.

Results

Overall, we found that from a societal perspective, the Saskatchewan PPMA program saved the province approximately $546,832 in 2014, while according to the public payer perspective, the program was only marginally cost-saving in 2014. After 5 years of implementation, from a societal perspective, cumulative cost savings were projected to be $3,482,660, and the return on investment ratio was estimated to be 2.53.

Conclusions

Our results demonstrate that this type of program may prove cost-saving and lead to improved access to the health care system in Canada, especially if savings to society are considered. This type of PPMA program may prove economically feasible and beneficial in many countries considering expanding pharmacists scope of practice.
Zusatzmaterial
Additional file 1. List of prescribed drug for each minor ailment with their prices and markup. This table contains list of all prescribed drug for 14 minor ailment along with their price and mark-up fee in PPMA.
Literatur
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