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Erschienen in: Clinical Autonomic Research 4/2023

27.05.2023 | Letter to the Editor

Higher sympathetic transduction is independently associated with greater very short-term diastolic blood pressure variability in young healthy males and females

verfasst von: Myles W. O’Brien, Massimo Nardone, Monique Foster, Yasmine Coovadia, Charlotte W. Usselman, Chloe E. Taylor, Philip J. Millar, Derek S. Kimmerly

Erschienen in: Clinical Autonomic Research | Ausgabe 4/2023

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Excerpt

Arterial blood pressure is regulated on a beat-by-beat basis by vasoconstrictor sympathetic nerve activity directed towards skeletal muscle resistance vessels [i.e., muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)]. Very short-term blood pressure variability reflects rapid neural control of blood pressure, primarily though modulation of the cardiovagal and sympathetic arms of the arterial baroreflex. Examining pressor responses to individual MSNA bursts, or sympathetic transduction, provides novel information regarding sympathetic neural control of blood pressure [1]. The negative consequences of augmented sympathetic transduction are poorly understood. Larger vasoconstrictor responses to MSNA bursts lead to higher pressor responses, which could contribute to greater blood pressure fluctuations (i.e., larger blood pressure variability). In a small sample of older adults with elevated resting MSNA, sympathetic transduction was positively linearly correlated with beat-by-beat blood pressure variability [2]. It is unknown whether a sympathetic transduction blood pressure variability relationship exists in younger adults. …
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Metadaten
Titel
Higher sympathetic transduction is independently associated with greater very short-term diastolic blood pressure variability in young healthy males and females
verfasst von
Myles W. O’Brien
Massimo Nardone
Monique Foster
Yasmine Coovadia
Charlotte W. Usselman
Chloe E. Taylor
Philip J. Millar
Derek S. Kimmerly
Publikationsdatum
27.05.2023
Verlag
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Erschienen in
Clinical Autonomic Research / Ausgabe 4/2023
Print ISSN: 0959-9851
Elektronische ISSN: 1619-1560
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10286-023-00949-7

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