Skip to main content
main-content

01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

Differential increase in prevalence estimates of inadequate sleep among black and white Americans

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Girardin Jean-Louis, Michael A. Grandner, Shawn D. Youngstedt, Natasha J. Williams, Ferdinand Zizi, Daniel F. Sarpong, Gbenga G. Ogedegbe
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

JLG, MAG, SDY, NJW, FZ, DS, and GGO developed the conceptual model. JLG, MAG, SDY, DS, GGO contributed to the results and the discussion section. JLG, SDY, GGO drafted the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was used to ascertain whether increases in inadequate sleep differentially affected black and white Americans. We tested the hypothesis that prevalence estimates of inadequate sleep were consistently greater among blacks, and that temporal changes have affected these two strata differentially.

Methods

NHIS is an ongoing cross-sectional study of non-institutionalized US adults (≥18 years) providing socio-demographic, health risk, and medical factors. Sleep duration was coded as very short sleep [VSS] (<5 h), short sleep [SS] (5–6 h), or long sleep [LS] (>8 h), referenced to 7–8 h sleepers. Analyses adjusted for NHIS’ complex sampling design using SAS-callable SUDAAN.

Results

Among whites, the prevalence of VSS increased by 53 % (1.5 % to 2.3 %) from 1977 to 2009 and the prevalence of SS increased by 32 % (19.3 % to 25.4 %); prevalence of LS decreased by 30 % (11.2 % to 7.8 %). Among blacks, the prevalence of VSS increased by 21 % (3.3 % to 4.0 %) and the prevalence of SS increased by 37 % (24.6 % to 33.7 %); prevalence of LS decreased by 42 % (16.1 % to 9.4 %). Adjusted multinomial regression analysis showed that odds of reporting inadequate sleep for whites were: VSS (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI = 1.13-1.74, p < 0.001), SS (OR = 1.34, 95 % CI = 1.25-1.44, p < 0.001), and LS (OR = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.85-1.05, NS). For blacks, estimates were: VSS (OR = 0.83, 95 % CI = 0.60-1.40, NS), SS (OR = 1.21, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.50, p < 0.001), and LS (OR = 0.84, 95 % CI = 0.64-1.08, NS).

Conclusions

Blacks and whites are characteristically different regarding the prevalence of inadequate sleep over the years. Temporal changes in estimates of inadequate sleep seem dependent upon individuals’ race/ethnicity.
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2015

BMC Public Health 1/2015 Zur Ausgabe