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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

Do discrimination, residential school attendance and cultural disruption add to individual-level diabetes risk among Aboriginal people in Canada?

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Roland F. Dyck, Chandima Karunanayake, Bonnie Janzen, Josh Lawson, Vivian R. Ramsden, Donna C. Rennie, P. Jenny Gardipy, Laura McCallum, Sylvia Abonyi, James A. Dosman, Jo-Ann Episkenew, Punam Pahwa, on behalf of the First Nations Lung Health Team
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

RD conceived of the study, participated in its design and analysis, and drafted the manuscript. CK participated in the design of the study and carried out the statistical analysis. BJ, JL, VRR, DR, and SA are co-investigators on the research grant, helped design the study, and reviewed and revised the manuscript for important intellectual content. JPG and LM provided community input into the design of the study, helped with acquisition of data, and reviewed and revised the manuscript from a community perspective. JD, JAE and PP are co-principal investigators on the research grant, helped design the study, and reviewed and revised the manuscript for important intellectual content. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Aboriginal peoples in Canada (First Nations, Metis and Inuit) are experiencing an epidemic of diabetes and its complications but little is known about the influence of factors attributed to colonization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible role of discrimination, residential school attendance and cultural disruption on diabetes occurrence among First Nations adults.

Methods

This 2012/13 cross sectional survey was conducted in two Saskatchewan First Nations communities comprising 580 households and 1570 adults. In addition to self-reported diabetes, interviewer-administered questionnaires collected information on possible diabetes determinants including widely recognized (e.g. age, sex, lifestyle, social determinants) and colonization-related factors. Clustering effect within households was adjusted using Generalized Estimating Equations.

Results

Responses were obtained from 874 (55.7 %) men and women aged 18 and older living in 406 (70.0 %) households. Diabetes prevalence was 15.8 % among women and 9.7 % among men. In the final models, increasing age and adiposity were significant risk factors for diabetes (e.g. OR 8.72 [95 % CI 4.62; 16.46] for those 50+, and OR 8.97 [95 % CI 3.58; 22.52] for BMI 30+) as was spending most time on-reserve. Residential school attendance and cultural disruption were not predictive of diabetes at an individual level but those experiencing the most discrimination had a lower prevalence of diabetes compared to those who experienced little discrimination (2.4 % versus 13.6 %; OR 0.11 [95 % CI 0.02; 0.50]). Those experiencing the most discrimination were significantly more likely to be married and to have higher incomes.

Conclusions

Known diabetes risk factors were important determinants of diabetes among First Nations people, but residential school attendance and cultural disruption were not predictive of diabetes on an individual level. In contrast, those experiencing the highest levels of discrimination had a low prevalence of diabetes. Although the reasons underlying this latter finding are unclear, it appears to relate to increased engagement with society off-reserve which may lead to an improvement in the social determinants of health. While this may have physical health benefits for First Nations people due to improved socio-economic status and other undefined influences, our findings suggest that this comes at a high emotional price.
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