Skip to main content
main-content

01.08.2011 | Research | Ausgabe 4/2011 Open Access

Critical Care 4/2011

Dynamic monitors of brain function: a new target in neurointensive care unit

Zeitschrift:
Critical Care > Ausgabe 4/2011
Autoren:
Enrico Bosco, Elisabetta Marton, Alberto Feletti, Bruno Scarpa, Pierluigi Longatti, Paolo Zanatta, Emanuele Giorgi, Carlo Sorbara
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​cc10315) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors' contributions

EB conceived of the study, participated in its design and helped to draft the manuscript. EM and AF participated in the design of the study and drafted the manuscript. BS performed the statistical analyses. PL and CS participated in the design and coordination of the study and helped to draft the manuscript. PZ conceived of the study and helped to draft the manuscript. EG helped to draft the manuscript and in performing the statistical analyses. Each author read and approved the final manuscript for publication.

Abstract

Introduction

Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings and continuous electroencephalography (EEG) are important tools with which to predict Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Their combined use may potentially allow for early detection of neurological impairment and more effective treatment of clinical deterioration.

Methods

We followed up 68 selected comatose patients between 2007 and 2009 who had been admitted to the Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit of Treviso Hospital after being diagnosed with subarachnoid haemorrhage (51 cases) or intracerebral haemorrhage (17 cases). Quantitative brain function monitoring was carried out using a remote EEG-SEP recording system connected to a small amplification head box with 28 channels and a multimodal stimulator (NEMO; EBNeuro, Italy NeMus 2; EBNeuro S.p.A., Via P. Fanfani 97/A - 50127 Firenze, Italy). For statistical analysis, we fit a binary logistic regression model to estimate the effect of brain function monitoring on the probability of GOS scores equal to 1. We also designed a proportional odds model for GOS scores, depending on amplitude and changes in both SEPs and EEG as well as on the joint effect of other related variables. Both families of models, logistic regression analysis and proportional odds ratios, were fit by using a maximum likelihood test and the partial effect of each variable was assessed by using a likelihood ratio test.

Results

Using the logistic regression model, we observed that progressive deterioration on the basis of EEG was associated with an increased risk of dying by almost 24% compared to patients whose condition did not worsen according to EEG. SEP decreases were also significant; for patients with worsening SEPs, the odds of dying increased to approximately 32%. In the proportional odds model, only modifications of Modified Glasgow Coma Scale scores and SEPs during hospitalisation statistically significantly predicted GOS scores. Patients whose SEPs worsened during the last time interval had an approximately 17 times greater probability of a poor GOS score compared to the other patients.

Conclusions

The combined use of SEPs and continuous EEG monitoring is a unique example of dynamic brain monitoring. The temporal variation of these two parameters evaluated by continuous monitoring can establish whether the treatments used for patients receiving neurocritical care are properly tailored to the neurological changes induced by the lesions responsible for secondary damage.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
13054_2010_9578_MOESM1_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 2
13054_2010_9578_MOESM2_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 3
13054_2010_9578_MOESM3_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 4
13054_2010_9578_MOESM4_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 5
13054_2010_9578_MOESM5_ESM.pdf
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 4/2011

Critical Care 4/2011 Zur Ausgabe

Neu im Fachgebiet AINS

Meistgelesene Bücher aus dem Fachgebiet AINS

  • 2014 | Buch

    Komplikationen in der Anästhesie

    Fallbeispiele Analyse Prävention

    Aus Fehlern lernen und dadurch Zwischenfälle vermeiden! Komplikationen oder Zwischenfälle in der Anästhesie können für Patienten schwerwiegende Folgen haben. Häufig sind sie eine Kombination menschlicher, organisatorischer und technischer Fehler.

    Herausgeber:
    Matthias Hübler, Thea Koch
  • 2013 | Buch

    Anästhesie Fragen und Antworten

    1655 Fakten für die Facharztprüfung und das Europäische Diplom für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin (DESA)

    Mit Sicherheit erfolgreich in Prüfung und Praxis! Effektiv wiederholen und im entscheidenden Moment die richtigen Antworten parat haben - dafür ist dieses beliebte Prüfungsbuch garantiert hilfreich. Anhand der Multiple-Choice-Fragen ist die optimale Vorbereitung auf das Prüfungsprinzip der D.E.A.A. gewährleistet.

    Autoren:
    Prof. Dr. Franz Kehl, Dr. Hans-Joachim Wilke
  • 2011 | Buch

    Pharmakotherapie in der Anästhesie und Intensivmedizin

    Wie und wieso wirken vasoaktive Substanzen und wie werden sie wirksam eingesetzt Welche Substanzen eignen sich zur perioperativen Myokardprojektion? 
    Kenntnisse zur Pharmakologie und deren Anwendung sind das notwendige Rüstzeug für den Anästhesisten und Intensivmediziner. Lernen Sie von erfahrenen Anästhesisten und Pharmakologen.

    Herausgeber:
    Prof. Dr. Peter H. Tonner, Prof. Dr. Lutz Hein
  • 2013 | Buch

    Anästhesie und Intensivmedizin – Prüfungswissen

    für die Fachpflege

    Fit in Theorie, Praxis und Prüfung! In diesem Arbeitsbuch werden alle Fakten der Fachweiterbildung abgebildet. So können Fachweiterbildungsteilnehmer wie auch langjährige Mitarbeiter in der Anästhesie und Intensivmedizin ihr Wissen gezielt überprüfen, vertiefen und festigen.

    Autor:
    Prof. Dr. Reinhard Larsen

Mail Icon II Newsletter

Bestellen Sie unseren kostenlosen Newsletter Update AINS und bleiben Sie gut informiert – ganz bequem per eMail.

Bildnachweise