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01.12.2014 | Original research | Ausgabe 1/2014 Open Access

Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine 1/2014

Effectiveness of a simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation training program for the non-medical staff of a university hospital

Zeitschrift:
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine > Ausgabe 1/2014
Autoren:
Tomoya Hirose, Taku Iwami, Hiroshi Ogura, Hisatake Matsumoto, Tomohiko Sakai, Kouji Yamamoto, Toshiaki Mano, Yuji Fujino, Takeshi Shimazu
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1757-7241-22-31) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare in relation to this manuscript.

Authors’ contributions

TH, TI, and TS designed the study. TH, HM, TS, and KY collected and generated the data. TH wrote the first draft. TH, TI, HO, KY, TM, YF and TS analyzed the data and helped to draft the manuscript. All of the authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

The 2010 Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendations Statement recommended that short video/computer self-instruction courses, with minimal or no instructor coaching, combined with hands-on practice can be considered an effective alternative to instructor-led basic life support courses. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program for non-medical staff working at a university hospital.

Methods

Before and immediately after a 45-min CPR training program consisting of instruction on chest compression and automated external defibrillator (AED) use with a personal training manikin, CPR skills were automatically recorded and evaluated. Participants’ attitudes towards CPR were evaluated by a questionnaire survey.

Results

From September 2011 through March 2013, 161 participants attended the program. We evaluated chest compression technique in 109 of these participants. The number of chest compressions delivered after the program versus that before was significantly greater (110.8 ± 13.0/min vs 94.2 ± 27.4/min, p < 0.0001), interruption of chest compressions was significantly shorter (0.05 ± 0.34 sec/30 sec vs 0.89 ± 3.52 sec/30 sec, p < 0.05), mean depth of chest compressions was significantly greater (57.6 ± 6.8 mm vs 52.2 ± 9.4 mm, p < 0.0001), and the proportion of incomplete chest compressions of <5 cm among all chest compressions was significantly decreased (8.9 ± 23.2% vs 38.6 ± 42.9%, p < 0.0001). Of the 159 participants who responded to the questionnaire survey after the program, the proportion of participants who answered ‘I can check for a response,’ ‘I can perform chest compressions,’ and ‘I can absolutely or I think I can use an AED’ increased versus that before the program (81.8% vs 19.5%, 77.4% vs 10.1%, 84.3% vs 23.3%, respectively).

Conclusions

A 45-min simplified CPR training program on chest compression and AED use improved CPR quality and the attitude towards CPR and AED use of non-medical staff of a university hospital.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
13049_2014_753_MOESM1_ESM.tiff
Authors’ original file for figure 2
13049_2014_753_MOESM2_ESM.tiff
Authors’ original file for figure 3
13049_2014_753_MOESM3_ESM.pdf
Authors’ original file for figure 4
13049_2014_753_MOESM4_ESM.pdf
Literatur
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