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12.10.2017 | Review | Ausgabe 12/2017 Open Access

Osteoporosis International 12/2017

Global dietary calcium intake among adults: a systematic review

Zeitschrift:
Osteoporosis International > Ausgabe 12/2017
Autoren:
E. M. Balk, G. P. Adam, V. N. Langberg, A. Earley, P. Clark, P. R. Ebeling, A. Mithal, R. Rizzoli, C. A. F. Zerbini, D. D. Pierroz, B. Dawson-Hughes, for the International Osteoporosis Foundation Calcium Steering Committee
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s00198-017-4230-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
A correction to this article is available online at https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s00198-018-4447-3.

Abstract

Low calcium intake may adversely affect bone health in adults. Recognizing the presence of low calcium intake is necessary to develop national strategies to optimize intake. To highlight regions where calcium intake should be improved, we systematically searched for the most representative national dietary calcium intake data in adults from the general population in all countries. We searched 13 electronic databases and requested data from domain experts. Studies were double-screened for eligibility. Data were extracted into a standard form. We developed an interactive global map, categorizing countries based on average calcium intake and summarized differences in intake based on sex, age, and socioeconomic status. Searches yielded 9780 abstracts. Across the 74 countries with data, average national dietary calcium intake ranges from 175 to 1233 mg/day. Many countries in Asia have average dietary calcium intake less than 500 mg/day. Countries in Africa and South America mostly have low calcium intake between about 400 and 700 mg/day. Only Northern European countries have national calcium intake greater than 1000 mg/day. Survey data for three quarters of available countries were not nationally representative. Average calcium intake is generally lower in women than men, but there are no clear patterns across countries regarding relative calcium intake by age, sex, or socioeconomic status. The global calcium map reveals that many countries have low average calcium intake. But recent, nationally representative data are mostly lacking. This review draws attention to regions where measures to increase calcium intake are likely to have skeletal benefits.

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Zusatzmaterial
ESM 1 (DOCX 43 kb)
198_2017_4230_MOESM1_ESM.docx
ESM 2 (DOCX 49 kb)
198_2017_4230_MOESM2_ESM.docx
ESM 3 (DOCX 130 kb)
198_2017_4230_MOESM3_ESM.docx
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