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01.12.2012 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

BMC Health Services Research 1/2012

Hardship financing of healthcare among rural poor in Orissa, India

Zeitschrift:
BMC Health Services Research > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Erika Binnendijk, Ruth Koren, David M Dror
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1472-6963-12-23) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

7. Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

8. Authors' contributions

DMD is the lead researcher and responsible for overall project management. EB, DMD and RK are responsible for the study concept and design. EB supervised the fieldwork and was responsible for the data management of the household survey. EB, RK and DMD (in order of contribution) analysed and interpreted the data and drafted the manuscript. All authors read, revised and approved the final version of the manuscript.

Abstract

Background

This study examines health-related "hardship financing" in order to get better insights on how poor households finance their out-of-pocket healthcare costs. We define hardship financing as having to borrow money with interest or to sell assets to pay out-of-pocket healthcare costs.

Methods

Using survey data of 5,383 low-income households in Orissa, one of the poorest states of India, we investigate factors influencing the risk of hardship financing with the use of a logistic regression.

Results

Overall, about 25% of the households (that had any healthcare cost) reported hardship financing during the year preceding the survey. Among households that experienced a hospitalization, this percentage was nearly 40%, but even among households with outpatient or maternity-related care around 25% experienced hardship financing.
Hardship financing is explained not merely by the wealth of the household (measured by assets) or how much is spent out-of-pocket on healthcare costs, but also by when the payment occurs, its frequency and its duration (e.g. more severe in cases of chronic illnesses). The location where a household resides remains a major predictor of the likelihood to have hardship financing despite all other household features included in the model.

Conclusions

Rural poor households are subjected to considerable and protracted financial hardship due to the indirect and longer-term deleterious effects of how they cope with out-of-pocket healthcare costs. The social network that households can access influences exposure to hardship financing. Our findings point to the need to develop a policy solution that would limit that exposure both in quantum and in time. We therefore conclude that policy interventions aiming to ensure health-related financial protection would have to demonstrate that they have reduced the frequency and the volume of hardship financing.
Zusatzmaterial
Additional file 1: Demographics & socioeconomic status disaggregated for members and non-members. This file contains the same information of Table 1 on demographics and socioeconomic status but separate for the member and non-member sub-cohorts (as defined in the methods section). (DOC 56 KB)
Additional file 2: Morbidity, healthcare availability, utilization and cost disaggregated for members and non-members. This file contains the same information of Table 2 on morbidity, healthcare availability, utilization and cost but separate for the member and non-member sub-cohorts (as defined in the methods section). (DOC 43 KB)
Authors’ original file for figure 1
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Authors’ original file for figure 2
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Authors’ original file for figure 3
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