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01.12.2012 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

BMC Health Services Research 1/2012

Implementation of ICD-10 in Canada: how has it impacted coded hospital discharge data?

Zeitschrift:
BMC Health Services Research > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Robin L Walker, Deirdre A Hennessy, Helen Johansen, Christie Sambell, Lisa Lix, Hude Quan
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1472-6963-12-149) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

RW contributed conception and design, drafted the manuscript, prepared tables, and interpreted data. DH contributed to the conception and design, helped draft and critically revised the manuscript. HJ participated in study design, provided the data, and critically revised the manuscript. CS contributed to conception and design and performed statistical analyses. LL participated in the interpretation of data and critically revised the manuscript for intellectual content. HQ contributed to the conception and design, oversaw the project including analysis and writing, interpreted data and critically revised the manuscript for intellectual content. All authors have read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to assess whether or not the change in coding classification had an impact on diagnosis and comorbidity coding in hospital discharge data across Canadian provinces.

Methods

This study examined eight years (fiscal years 1998 to 2005) of hospital records from the Hospital Person-Oriented Information database (HPOI) derived from the Canadian national Discharge Abstract Database. The average number of coded diagnoses per hospital visit was examined from 1998 to 2005 for provinces that switched from International Classifications of Disease 9th version (ICD-9-CM) to ICD-10-CA during this period. The average numbers of type 2 and 3 diagnoses were also described. The prevalence of the Charlson comorbidities and distribution of the Charlson score one year before and one year after ICD-10 implementation for each of the 9 provinces was examined. The prevalence of at least one of the seventeen Charlson comorbidities one year before and one year after ICD-10 implementation were described by hospital characteristics (teaching/non-teaching, urban/rural, volume of patients).

Results

Nine Canadian provinces switched from ICD-9-CM to ICD-I0-CA over a 6 year period starting in 2001. The average number of diagnoses coded per hospital visit for all code types over the study period was 2.58. After implementation of ICD-10-CA a decrease in the number of diagnoses coded was found in four provinces whereas the number of diagnoses coded in the other five provinces remained similar. The prevalence of at least one of the seventeen Charlson conditions remained relatively stable after ICD-10 was implemented, as did the distribution of the Charlson score. When stratified by hospital characteristics, the prevalence of at least one Charlson condition decreased after ICD-10-CA implementation, particularly for low volume hospitals.

Conclusion

In conclusion, implementation of ICD-10-CA in Canadian provinces did not substantially change coding practices, but there was some coding variation in the average number of diagnoses per hospital visit across provinces.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
12913_2011_2041_MOESM1_ESM.pdf
Authors’ original file for figure 2
12913_2011_2041_MOESM2_ESM.pdf
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