Skip to main content
main-content

24.09.2019 | Clinical Study | Ausgabe 2/2019

Journal of Neuro-Oncology 2/2019

Increased cochlear radiation dose predicts delayed hearing loss following both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

Zeitschrift:
Journal of Neuro-Oncology > Ausgabe 2/2019
Autoren:
Kunal S. Patel, Edwin Ng, Taranjit Kaur, Tyler Miao, Tania Kaprealian, Percy Lee, Nader Pouratian, Michael T. Selch, Antonio A. F. De Salles, Quinton Gopen, Stephen Tenn, Isaac Yang
Wichtige Hinweise

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

Purpose

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) are noninvasive therapies for vestibular schwannomas providing excellent tumor control. However, delayed hearing loss after radiation therapy remains an issue. One potential target to for improving hearing rates is limiting radiation exposure to the cochlea.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed 100 patients undergoing either SRS with 12 Gy (n = 43) or fSRT with 50 Gy over 28 fractions (n = 57) for vestibular schwannoma. Univariate and multivariate analysis were carried out to identify predictors of hearing loss as measured by the Gardner Robertson scale after radiation therapy.

Results

Deterioration of hearing occurred in 30% of patients with SRS and 26% with fSRT. The overall long term (> 2 year) progression rates were 20% for SRS and 16% for fSRT. Patients with a decrease in their Gardner Robertson hearing score and those that loss serviceable hearing had significantly higher average minimal doses to the cochlea in both SRS and fSRT cohorts. ROC analysis showed that a cut off of 5 Gy and 35 Gy, for SRS and fSRT respectively, predicted hearing loss with high sensitivity/specificity.

Conclusion

Our data suggests the minimal dose of radiation that the cochlear volume is exposed to is a predictor of delayed hearing loss after either SRS or fSRT. A threshold of 5 Gy/35 Gy may lead to improved hearing preservation after radiotherapy. Further prospective multi center studies can further elucidate this mechanism.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

★ PREMIUM-INHALT
e.Med Interdisziplinär

Mit e.Med Interdisziplinär erhalten Sie Zugang zu allen CME-Fortbildungen und Fachzeitschriften auf SpringerMedizin.de. Zusätzlich können Sie eine Zeitschrift Ihrer Wahl in gedruckter Form beziehen – ohne Aufpreis.

Weitere Produktempfehlungen anzeigen
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 2/2019

Journal of Neuro-Oncology 2/2019 Zur Ausgabe
  1. Sie können e.Med Neurologie & Psychiatrie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  2. Sie können e.Med Neurologie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  3. Das kostenlose Testabonnement läuft nach 14 Tagen automatisch und formlos aus. Dieses Abonnement kann nur einmal getestet werden.

Neu im Fachgebiet Onkologie

Mail Icon II Newsletter

Bestellen Sie unseren kostenlosen Newsletter Update Onkologie und bleiben Sie gut informiert – ganz bequem per eMail.

Bildnachweise