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01.12.2012 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

Malaria Journal 1/2012

Is dengue and malaria co-infection more severe than single infections? A retrospective matched-pair study in French Guiana

Zeitschrift:
Malaria Journal > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Loïc Epelboin, Matthieu Hanf, Philippe Dussart, Sihem Ouar-Epelboin, Félix Djossou, Mathieu Nacher, Bernard Carme
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1475-2875-11-142) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

LE participated in the design of the study, performed the statistical analysis, contributed to the analysis and interpretation of data and drafted the manuscript. MH performed the statistical analysis and contributed to the analysis and interpretation of data. PD carried out the the immunoassays and the RT-PCR, contributed to the analysis and interpretation of data and helped to draft the manuscript SOE contributed to conception of the study and the acquisition of data. FD conceived of the study and contributed to the analysis and interpretation of data and helped to draft the manuscript. MN conceived of the study and contributed to the analysis and interpretation of data and helped to draft the manuscript. BC conceived the study and contributed to the analysis and interpretation of data and helped to draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Dengue and malaria are two major arthropod-borne infections in tropical areas, but dual infections were only described for the first time in 2005. Reports of these concomitant infections are scarce and there is no evidence of more severe clinical and biological pictures than single infections.

Methods

To compare co-infections to dengue alone and malaria alone, a retrospective matched-pair study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 among patients admitted in the emergency department of Cayenne hospital, French Guiana.

Results

104 dengue and malaria co-infection cases were identified during the study period and 208 individuals were matched in two comparison groups: dengue alone and malaria alone. In bivariate analysis, co-infection clinical picture was more severe than separated infections, in particular using the severe malaria WHO criteria. In multivariate analysis, independent factors associated with co-infection versus dengue were: masculine gender, CRP level > 50 mg/L, thrombocytopaenia < 50 109/L, and low haematocrit <36% and independent factors significantly associated with co-infections versus malaria were red cells transfusion, low haematocrit < 36%, thrombocytopaenia < 50 109/L and low Plasmodium parasitic load < 0.001%.

Conclusions

In the present study, dengue and malaria co-infection clinical picture seems to be more severe than single infections in French Guiana, with a greater risk of deep thrombocytopaenia and anaemia.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
12936_2012_2110_MOESM1_ESM.pdf
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