Skip to main content
main-content

09.11.2017 | Ausgabe 2/2018

Maternal and Child Health Journal 2/2018

Maternal Hypertension, Antihypertensive Medication Use, and Small for Gestational Age Births in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997–2011

Zeitschrift:
Maternal and Child Health Journal > Ausgabe 2/2018
Autoren:
Sarah C. Fisher, Alissa R. Van Zutphen, Paul A. Romitti, Marilyn L. Browne, for the National Birth Defects Prevention Study
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10995-017-2395-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Abstract

Background Small for gestational age (SGA) birth is associated with poor long-term health outcomes. It is unclear whether maternal antihypertensive medication increases risk of SGA independently of maternal hypertension. Methods We analyzed associations between maternal hypertension and antihypertensive medication use and SGA among non-malformed singleton controls in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. We defined SGA as birthweight < 10th percentile for a given gestational age, sex, race/ethnicity, and parity. We included 1045 SGA and 10,019 non-SGA births. We used logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed interaction between hypertension, antihypertensive use, and maternal race/ethnicity and age. Results Overall, 122 (11.7%) SGA and 892 (8.9%) non-SGA mothers reported hypertension and 21 (2.0%) SGA and 154 (1.5%) non-SGA mothers reported antihypertensive use. The most commonly reported medications were centrally-acting antiadrenergics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. Compared to normotensive pregnancies, maternal hypertension, regardless of treatment (AOR, 1.49 [95% CI, 1.20, 1.86]), and untreated maternal hypertension [AOR, 1.46 (95% CI, 1.15, 1.86)] were associated with SGA. We observed a positive, but not significant, association between antihypertensive use and SGA. SGA risk varied by maternal race/ethnicity, being highest among Hispanic mothers, and age, being highest among mothers ≥ 35 years, but statistical tests for interaction were not significant. Conclusions Consistent with the literature, our findings suggest that maternal hypertension slightly increases SGA risk. We did not observe an appreciably increased SGA risk associated with antihypertensive medication use beyond that of the underlying maternal hypertension.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

★ PREMIUM-INHALT
e.Med Interdisziplinär

Mit e.Med Interdisziplinär erhalten Sie Zugang zu allen CME-Fortbildungen und Fachzeitschriften auf SpringerMedizin.de. Zusätzlich können Sie eine Zeitschrift Ihrer Wahl in gedruckter Form beziehen – ohne Aufpreis.

Weitere Produktempfehlungen anzeigen
Zusatzmaterial
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 17 KB)
10995_2017_2395_MOESM1_ESM.docx
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 2/2018

Maternal and Child Health Journal 2/2018 Zur Ausgabe
  1. Das kostenlose Testabonnement läuft nach 14 Tagen automatisch und formlos aus. Dieses Abonnement kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  2. Das kostenlose Testabonnement läuft nach 14 Tagen automatisch und formlos aus. Dieses Abonnement kann nur einmal getestet werden.