Skip to main content
main-content

01.12.2012 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

Malaria Journal 1/2012

Modelling malaria treatment practices in Bangladesh using spatial statistics

Zeitschrift:
Malaria Journal > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Ubydul Haque, Lauren M Scott, Masahiro Hashizume, Emily Fisher, Rashidul Haque, Taro Yamamoto, Gregory E Glass
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1475-2875-11-63) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors' contributions

UH and LS conceived the study design, prepared the data, performed the analysis, interpreted results and produced the final manuscript. MH, RH, TY and GG were responsible for the conception, overall scientific management, interpretation of results, and critically reviewed the final report. EF was responsible for the interpretation of results and critically reviewed the final report. Principal investigator of the project: UH. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Malaria treatment-seeking practices vary worldwide and Bangladesh is no exception. Individuals from 88 villages in Rajasthali were asked about their treatment-seeking practices. A portion of these households preferred malaria treatment from the National Control Programme, but still a large number of households continued to use drug vendors and approximately one fourth of the individuals surveyed relied exclusively on non-control programme treatments. The risks of low-control programme usage include incomplete malaria treatment, possible misuse of anti-malarial drugs, and an increased potential for drug resistance.

Methods

The spatial patterns of treatment-seeking practices were first examined using hot-spot analysis (Local Getis-Ord Gi statistic) and then modelled using regression. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression identified key factors explaining more than 80% of the variation in control programme and vendor treatment preferences. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) was then used to assess where each factor was a strong predictor of treatment-seeking preferences.

Results

Several factors including tribal affiliation, housing materials, household densities, education levels, and proximity to the regional urban centre, were found to be effective predictors of malaria treatment-seeking preferences. The predictive strength of each of these factors, however, varied across the study area. While education, for example, was a strong predictor in some villages, it was less important for predicting treatment-seeking outcomes in other villages.

Conclusion

Understanding where each factor is a strong predictor of treatment-seeking outcomes may help in planning targeted interventions aimed at increasing control programme usage. Suggested strategies include providing additional training for the Building Resources across Communities (BRAC) health workers, implementing educational programmes, and addressing economic factors.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
12936_2011_2065_MOESM1_ESM.pdf
Authors’ original file for figure 2
12936_2011_2065_MOESM2_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 3
12936_2011_2065_MOESM3_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 4
12936_2011_2065_MOESM4_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 5
12936_2011_2065_MOESM5_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 6
12936_2011_2065_MOESM6_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 7
12936_2011_2065_MOESM7_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 8
12936_2011_2065_MOESM8_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 9
12936_2011_2065_MOESM9_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 10
12936_2011_2065_MOESM10_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 11
12936_2011_2065_MOESM11_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 12
12936_2011_2065_MOESM12_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 13
12936_2011_2065_MOESM13_ESM.jpeg
Authors’ original file for figure 14
12936_2011_2065_MOESM14_ESM.jpeg
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2012

Malaria Journal 1/2012 Zur Ausgabe

Neu im Fachgebiet Innere Medizin

Meistgelesene Bücher aus der Inneren Medizin

2017 | Buch

Rheumatologie aus der Praxis

Entzündliche Gelenkerkrankungen – mit Fallbeispielen

Dieses Fachbuch macht mit den wichtigsten chronisch entzündlichen Gelenk- und Wirbelsäulenerkrankungen vertraut. Anhand von über 40 instruktiven Fallbeispielen werden anschaulich diagnostisches Vorgehen, therapeutisches Ansprechen und der Verlauf …

Herausgeber:
Rudolf Puchner

2016 | Buch

Ambulant erworbene Pneumonie

Was, wann, warum – Dieses Buch bietet differenzierte Diagnostik und Therapie der ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie zur sofortigen sicheren Anwendung. Entsprechend der neuesten Studien und Leitlinien aller wichtigen Fachgesellschaften.

Herausgeber:
Santiago Ewig

Mail Icon II Newsletter

Bestellen Sie unseren kostenlosen Newsletter Update Innere Medizin und bleiben Sie gut informiert – ganz bequem per eMail.

© Springer Medizin 

Bildnachweise