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18.11.2019 | Images in Practice Open Access

Presentation and Management of a Postoperative Spinal Pseudomeningocele

Zeitschrift:
Pain and Therapy
Autoren:
Sindhuja Surapaneni, Jamal Hasoon, Vwaire Orhurhu, Omar Viswanath, Alan D. Kaye, Cyrus Yazdi, Aner Musa, Ivan Urits
Wichtige Hinweise

Enhanced Digital Features

To view enhanced digital features for this article, go to https://​doi.​org/​10.​6084/​m9.​figshare.​10247621.
Key Summary Points
A pseudomeningocele, or a collection of cerebrospinal fluid, typically presents as a postoperative complication, and can be asymptomatic and resolve spontaneously, though some present with headaches, low back pain, or radicular symptoms.
The best management of spinal pseudomeningocele is debated, but important considerations include nerve root involvement, pseudomeningocele size and location.
Revision surgery and dural tear repair may be an important option in symptomatic patients. In patients who are asymptomatic, nonsurgical management can result in spontaneous resolution of the pseudomeningocele with scar formation over time.

Case

The aim of this case is to highlight the importance of radiographic determination of the presence of a pseudomeningocele and the subsequent constellation of symptoms. A pseudomeningocele, or a collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), typically presents as a postoperative complication [ 1]. Spinal pseudomeningoceles can be asymptomatic and resolve spontaneously, though some present with headaches, low back pain, or radicular symptoms [ 2]. These are the radiographic findings of a female with chronic low back pain status post multiple spinal surgeries, most recently an L4–L5 revision laminectomy complicated by a CSF leak. She presented with paresthesia’s, subjective weakness, and an occipital headache. An MRI revealed a 4.5 × 4.8 × 11.4-cm CSF collection communicating with a 2.8 × 11.7 × 14-cm subcutaneous soft tissue fluid collection (Fig  1a, b). A small defect at the level of L5–S1 connecting the spinal canal to a posterior fluid collection was determined.
The best management of spinal pseudomeningocele is debated, but important considerations include nerve root involvement, pseudomeningocele size and location. Revision surgery and dural tear repair may be an important option in symptomatic patients. In patients who are asymptomatic, nonsurgical management can result in spontaneous resolution of the pseudomeningocele with scar formation over time [ 3, 4]. Informed consent for publication was obtained from the participant.

Acknowledgements

Funding

No funding or sponsorship was received for this study or publication of this article.

Authorship

All named authors meet the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) criteria for authorship for this article, take responsibility for the integrity of the work as a whole, and have given their approval for this version to be published.

Disclosures

Sindhuja Surapaneni, Jamal Hasoon, Vwaire Orhurhu, Omar Viswanath, Cyrus Yazdi, Aner Musa, and Ivan Urits have nothing to disclose. Alan D. Kaye is a member of the journal’s editorial board.

Compliance with Ethics Guidelines

Informed consent for publication was obtained from the participant.

Open Access

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by-nc/​4.​0/​), which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Literatur
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