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01.12.2016 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2016 Open Access

BioPsychoSocial Medicine 1/2016

Prevalence and related factors of common mental disorders during pregnancy in Japan: a cross-sectional study

Zeitschrift:
BioPsychoSocial Medicine > Ausgabe 1/2016
Autoren:
Kentaro Usuda, Daisuke Nishi, Miyuki Makino, Hisateru Tachimori, Yutaka Matsuoka, Yo Sano, Takako Konishi, Tadashi Takeshima
Wichtige Hinweise
An erratum to this article can be found at http://​dx.​doi.​org/​10.​1186/​s13030-016-0077-1.

Competing interests

Dr. Usuda has no conflicts of interest to declare. Dr. Nishi has received research grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Japan, lecture fees from NTT DoCoMo, Inc., and Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. Ms. Makino has no conflicts of interest to declare. Dr. Tachimori has received research grants from the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan, Intramural Research Grant for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders of National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry. Dr. Matsuoka has received research grants from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry of Japan, and the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan and has been a paid speaker for Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Mochida Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Suntory Wellness Ltd., Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., and the DHA & EPA Association. Dr. Sano has no conflicts of interest to declare. Dr. Konishi has received research grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. Dr. Takeshima has received research grants from the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan, Intramural Research Grant for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders of National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry. Any funding source had no role in the design and conduct of the study; data collection; data management; analysis; interpretation of the data; review or approval of the manuscript; or decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Authors’ contributions

KU and DN conceived and designed the study, DN obtained funding, KU, DN and MM collected the data, KU, DN and HT analyzed the data, all authors interpreted the data, KU and DN wrote the article in whole, all other authors revised the article critically. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Common mental disorders (CMD) during pregnancy can have a clearly harmful influence on both mothers and children. Some studies have reported related factors for mental disorders, such as region-specific background. This study examined the prevalence of CMD and its related factors in mid-pregnancy in Japan.

Methods

Pregnant women between 12 and 24 weeks gestation and aged ≥20 years were consecutively recruited at a maternity hospital in Japan between May 2014 and September 2014. CMD were diagnosed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), self-rated depressive symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and interpersonal traumatic experience was measured using the Life Events Checklist.

Results

Among 297 eligible pregnant women, 177 participated in the study. Two participants (1.1 %) met the criteria for major depressive disorder. The most frequent diagnosis was agoraphobia (n = 7; 3.9 %). Eleven participants (6.2 %) met the criteria for one or more diagnoses, with 2 participants having two mental disorders and 3 having three mental disorders. Six participants developed CMD after gestation. Logistic regression analysis revealed history of psychiatric disorder, past interpersonal traumatic experience, and feeling pressure to have a child were associated with CMD.

Conclusion

These findings indicate a lower prevalence of CMD in mid-pregnancy in Japan than reported in most other countries. Besides the related factors reported previously, feeling pressure to have a child might increase risk for CMD among pregnant women in Japan. Asian cultural background might be related to the lower CMD prevalence and risk factors identified in this study.
Literatur
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