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01.12.2012 | Original investigation | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

Cardiovascular Diabetology 1/2012

Previous gestational diabetes is independently associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, similarly to metabolic syndrome – a case control study

Zeitschrift:
Cardiovascular Diabetology > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Claudia Maria Vilas Freire, Felipe Batista Lima Barbosa, Maria Cristina C de Almeida, Paulo Augusto Carvalho Miranda, Márcia Melo Barbosa, Anelise Impeliziere Nogueira, Milena Moreira Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Pereira Nunes, Antônio Ribeiro-Oliveira Jr
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1475-2840-11-59) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors have no conflict of interest to disclose as related to this study.

Abstract

Background

Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, consequently, a higher cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to compare the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) from young women with pGDM to those with metabolic syndrome (MS) and to healthy controls (CG) to verify whether a past history of pGDM could be independently associated with increased cIMT.

Methods

This is a cross-sectional study performed in two academic referral centers. Seventy-nine women with pGDM, 30 women with MS, and 60 CG aged between 18 and 47 years were enrolled. They all underwent physical examination and had blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), and triglycerides determined. The cIMT was measured by ultrasound in several carotid segments. The primary endpoint was cIMT and clinically relevant parameters included as predictors were: age, systolic blood pressure, waist, BMI, total cholesterol, LDLc, triglycerides, fasting glucose, previous history of GDM as a whole group, previous history of GDM without MS, presence of DM, presence of MS, and parity.

Results

cIMT was significantly higher in pGDM when compared to CG in all sites of measurements (P < 0.05) except for the right common carotid. The pGDM women showed similar cIMT measurements to MS in all sites of measurements, except for the left carotid bifurcation, where it was significantly higher than MS (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis which included classical cardiovascular risk factors and was adjusted for confounders, pGDM was shown to be independently associated with increased composite cIMT (P < 0.01). The pGDM without risk factors further showed similar cIMT to MS (P > 0.05) and an increased cIMT when compared to controls (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

Previous GDM was independently associated with increased composite cIMT in this young population, similarly to those with MS and regardless the presence of established cardiovascular risk factors.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
12933_2012_475_MOESM1_ESM.tiff
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