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09.01.2019 | Original Article

Problems sleeping with prostate cancer: exploring possible risk factors for sleep disturbance in a population-based sample of survivors

Zeitschrift:
Supportive Care in Cancer
Autoren:
Rebecca Maguire, Frances J. Drummond, Paul Hanly, Anna Gavin, Linda Sharp
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s00520-018-4633-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sleeping problems in prostate cancer survivors and to explore the role of predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating factors in this process.

Methods

Using a cross-sectional design, 3348 prostate cancer survivors between 2 and 18 years post diagnosis reported experiences of insomnia using the QLQC30, along with their sociodemographic characteristics, health status and treatment(s) received. The EQ5D-5L and QLQPR25 assessed survivors’ overall and prostate cancer–specific health-related quality of life. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was constructed with three blocks: (1) predisposing (e.g. demographics at diagnosis), (2) precipitating (e.g. disease extent, treatment) and (3) perpetuating factors (e.g. side effects).

Results

Nineteen percent of survivors reported significant problems sleeping. The final model accounted for 31% of the variance in insomnia scores (p < .001). In order of magnitude, associates of sleep disturbance were urinary symptoms (β = 0.22; p < .001), experiencing symptoms of depression/anxiety (β = 0.18; p < .001), hormone treatment–related symptoms (β = 0.12; p = .001), pain (β = 0.10; p < .001) and bowel symptoms (β = 0.06; p = .005). Having a lower education and more comorbidities at diagnosis also predicted sleep problems.

Conclusion

Results suggest that it is the ongoing adverse effects of prostate cancer and its treatment (e.g. urinary symptoms) that put survivors most at risk of sleep problems. Strong associations with symptoms of depression/anxiety were also observed. Findings highlight the need for health care practitioners to treat and manage adverse effects of prostate cancer treatment in order to mitigate sleep disturbance in survivors.

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Zusatzmaterial
ESM 1 (DOCX 28 kb)
520_2018_4633_MOESM1_ESM.docx
ESM 2 (DOCX 28 kb)
520_2018_4633_MOESM2_ESM.docx
Literatur
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