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01.12.2012 | Review | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 1/2012

Quality of life of people with mental health problems: a synthesis of qualitative research

Zeitschrift:
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Janice Connell, John Brazier, Alicia O’Cathain, Myfanwy Lloyd-Jones, Suzy Paisley
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1477-7525-10-138) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

JC, primary researcher, screened titles and abstracts, reviewed included papers, conducted additional searches, developed the conceptual framework, analysed the data, and drafted the manuscript. JB, principal investigator, reviewed included papers, reviewed and advised on the conceptual framework. AOC, co-investigator, reviewed included papers, reviewed and advised on the conceptual framework. MLJ, co-investigator, screened titles and abstracts, reviewed included papers, and developed the conceptual framework. SP developed the search strategy, conducted the electronic database searches and drafted the related section of the manuscript. All authors reviewed and revised drafts and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Purpose

To identify the domains of quality of life important to people with mental health problems.

Method

A systematic review of qualitative research undertaken with people with mental health problems using a framework synthesis.

Results

We identified six domains: well-being and ill-being; control, autonomy and choice; self-perception; belonging; activity; and hope and hopelessness. Firstly, symptoms or ‘ill-being’ were an intrinsic aspect of quality of life for people with severe mental health problems. Additionally, a good quality of life was characterised by the feeling of being in control (particularly of distressing symptoms), autonomy and choice; a positive self-image; a sense of belonging; engagement in meaningful and enjoyable activities; and feelings of hope and optimism. Conversely, a poor quality life, often experienced by those with severe mental health difficulties, was characterized by feelings of distress; lack of control, choice and autonomy; low self-esteem and confidence; a sense of not being part of society; diminished activity; and a sense of hopelessness and demoralization.

Conclusions

Generic measures fail to address the complexity of quality of life measurement and the broad range of domains important to people with mental health problems.
Zusatzmaterial
Additional file 1: Appendix I. Summary of search iterations. (DOC 32 KB)
12955_2012_1052_MOESM1_ESM.doc
Additional file 2: Appendix II. Keyword search strategies. (DOC 72 KB)
12955_2012_1052_MOESM2_ESM.doc
Authors’ original file for figure 1
12955_2012_1052_MOESM3_ESM.pdf
Literatur
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