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19.03.2020 | Clinical Study

Racial and socioeconomic correlates of treatment and survival among patients with meningioma: a population-based study

Zeitschrift:
Journal of Neuro-Oncology
Autoren:
Hriday P. Bhambhvani, Adrian J. Rodrigues, Zachary A. Medress, Melanie Hayden Gephart
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s11060-020-03455-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Abstract

Background

Though meningioma is the most common primary brain tumor, there is a paucity of epidemiologic studies investigating disparities in treatment and patient outcomes. Therefore, we sought to explore how sociodemographic factors are associated with rates of gross total resection (GTR) and radiotherapy as well as survival.

Methods

The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried to identify adult patients with meningioma diagnosed between 2005 and 2015. Socioeconomic status (SES) was determined using a validated composite index in which patients were stratified into tertiles and quintiles. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to identify predictors of treatment and survival, respectively.

Results

71,098 patients met our inclusion criteria. Low SES quintile was associated with reduced odds of receiving GTR (OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.69–0.83, p < 0.0001) and radiotherapy (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.76–0.91, p < 0.0001) as well as worse survival (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.41–1.56) as compared to the highest SES quintile. Black patients had reduced odds of GTR (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.67–0.71, p < 0.0001) and worse survival (HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.18–1.29, p < 0.0001) as compared to white patients.

Conclusions

This national study of patients with meningioma found socioeconomic status and race to be independent inverse correlates of likelihood of GTR, radiotherapy, and survival. Limited access to care may underlie these disparities in part, and future studies are warranted to identify specific causes for these findings.

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