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Erschienen in: Surgical Endoscopy 2/2017

23.06.2016

Risks of subsequent abdominal operations after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

verfasst von: Puraj P. Patel, Michael W. Love, Joseph A. Ewing, Jeremy A. Warren, William S. Cobb, Alfredo M. Carbonell

Erschienen in: Surgical Endoscopy | Ausgabe 2/2017

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Abstract

Introduction

Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) with intraperitoneal mesh placement is well established; however, the fate of patients requiring future abdominal operations is not well understood. This study identifies the characteristics of LVHR patients undergoing reoperation and the sequelae of reoperation.

Methods

A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database at a hernia referral center identified patients who underwent LVHR between 2005 and 2014 and then underwent a subsequent abdominal operation. The outcomes of those reoperations were collected. Data are presented as a mean with ranges.

Results

A total of 733 patients underwent LVHR. The average age was 56.5 years, BMI 33.9 kg/m2, hernia size 115 cm2 (range 1–660 cm2), and mesh size 411 cm2 (range 17.7–1360 cm2). After a mean follow-up of 19.4 months, the overall hernia recurrence rate was 8.4 %. Subsequent abdominal operations were performed in 17 % (125 patients) at a mean 2.2 years. The most common indication for reoperation was recurrent hernia (33 patients, 26.4 %), followed by bowel obstruction (18 patients, 14.4 %), hepatopancreaticobiliary (17 patients, 13.6 %) and infected mesh removal (15 patients, 12 %), gynecologic (10 patients, 8 %), colorectal (8 patients, 6.4 %), bariatric (4 patients, 3 %), trauma (1 patient, 0.8 %), and other (19 patients, 15 %). The overall incidence of enterotomy or unplanned bowel resection (EBR) at reoperation was 4 %. This occurred exclusively in those reoperated for complete bowel obstruction, and the reason for EBR was mesh–bowel adhesions. No other indication for reoperation resulted in EBR. The incidence of secondary mesh infection after subsequent operation was 2.4 %.

Conclusion

In a large consecutive series of LVHR, the rate of abdominal reoperation was 17 %. Generally, these reoperations can be performed safely. A reoperation for bowel obstruction, however, may carry an increased risk of EBR as a direct result of mesh–bowel adhesions. Secondary mesh infection after reoperation, although rare, may also occur. Surgeons should discuss with their patients the potential long-term implications of having an intraperitoneal mesh and how it may impact future abdominal surgery.
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Metadaten
Titel
Risks of subsequent abdominal operations after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair
verfasst von
Puraj P. Patel
Michael W. Love
Joseph A. Ewing
Jeremy A. Warren
William S. Cobb
Alfredo M. Carbonell
Publikationsdatum
23.06.2016
Verlag
Springer US
Erschienen in
Surgical Endoscopy / Ausgabe 2/2017
Print ISSN: 0930-2794
Elektronische ISSN: 1432-2218
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-016-5038-z

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