Skip to main content
main-content

01.12.2018 | Review | Ausgabe 1/2018 Open Access

Trials 1/2018

Routinely collected data for randomized trials: promises, barriers, and implications

Zeitschrift:
Trials > Ausgabe 1/2018
Autoren:
Kimberly A. Mc Cord, Rustam Al-Shahi Salman, Shaun Treweek, Heidi Gardner, Daniel Strech, William Whiteley, John P. A. Ioannidis, Lars G. Hemkens

Abstract

Background

Routinely collected health data (RCD) are increasingly used for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This can provide three major benefits: increasing value through better feasibility (reducing costs, time, and resources), expanding the research agenda (performing trials for research questions otherwise not amenable to trials), and offering novel design and data collection options (e.g., point-of-care trials and other designs directly embedded in routine care). However, numerous hurdles and barriers must be considered pertaining to regulatory, ethical, and data aspects, as well as the costs of setting up the RCD infrastructure. Methodological considerations may be different from those in traditional RCTs: RCD are often collected by individuals not involved in the study and who are therefore blinded to the allocation of trial participants. Another consideration is that RCD trials may lead to greater misclassification biases or dilution effects, although these may be offset by randomization and larger sample sizes. Finally, valuable insights into external validity may be provided when using RCD because it allows pragmatic trials to be performed.

Methods

We provide an overview of the promises, challenges, and potential barriers, methodological implications, and research needs regarding RCD for RCTs.

Results

RCD have substantial potential for improving the conduct and reducing the costs of RCTs, but a multidisciplinary approach is essential to address emerging practical barriers and methodological implications.

Conclusions

Future research should be directed toward such issues and specifically focus on data quality validation, alternative research designs and how they affect outcome assessment, and aspects of reporting and transparency.
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2018

Trials 1/2018 Zur Ausgabe