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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2016 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2016

Screen-based behaviour in school-aged children with long-term illness

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2016
Autoren:
Daniela Husarova, Andrea Madarasova Geckova, Lukas Blinka, Anna Sevcikova, Jitse P. van Dijk, Sijmen A. Reijneveld
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

DB contributed to the conception and design of the study and the drafting of the manuscript. AMG contributed to analysis and interpretation of the data and revising the manuscript. AS contributed to interpretation of the data and revising the manuscript. LB contributed to interpretation of data analysis and revising the manuscript. JPvD contributed to design of the study and revising of the manuscript. SAR contributed to interpretation of the data and revising the manuscript. All authors have read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Evidence is lacking on the screen-based behaviour of adolescents with a chronic condition. The aim of our study was to analyse differences in screen-based behaviour of adolescents by long-term illness, asthma and learning disabilities.

Methods

We used data from the cross-sectional Health Behaviour of School-aged Children study collected in 2014 among Slovak adolescents (age 13 to 15 years old, N = 2682, 49.7 % boys). We analysed the associations between screen-based behaviour and long-term illness, asthma and learning disabilities using logistic regression models adjusted for gender.

Results

We found no associations between screen-based behaviour and long-term illness, except that children with asthma had a 1.60-times higher odds of excessively playing computer games than healthy children (95 % confidence interval of odds ratio (CI): 1.11–2.30). Children with learning disabilities had 1.71-times higher odds of risky use of the Internet (95 % CI: 1.19–2.45).

Conclusion

Adolescents with a long-term illness or with a chronic condition or a learning disability do not differ from their peers in screen-based activities. Exceptions are children with asthma and children with learning disabilities, who reported more risky screen-based behaviour.
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