Skip to main content
main-content

01.12.2017 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2017 Open Access

Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 1/2017

Self-efficacy moderates the relationship between health comparisons and social exclusion: results of the German ageing survey

Zeitschrift:
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes > Ausgabe 1/2017
Autoren:
André Hajek, Hans-Helmut König

Abstract

Background

Little is known about the consequences of health comparisons. Negative health comparisons might, for example, result in emotions such as anger or frustration. These negative emotions might intensify feelings of social exclusion. Thus, the objective of the current study was to investigate whether health comparisons are associated with social exclusion. Moreover, it was examined whether the relation between health comparisons and social exclusion is moderated by self-efficacy.

Methods

We analyzed cross-sectional data of N = 7838 individuals from the German Ageing Survey. The German Ageing Survey is a representative sample of community-residing individuals aged 40 and over. An established social exclusion scale was used. The degree of self-efficacy was measured according to Schwarzer and Jerusalem. Health comparisons were measured with the question “How would you rate your health compared with other people your age” (Much better; somewhat better; the same; somewhat worse, much worse).

Results

Multiple linear regressions revealed that negative health comparisons were associated with feelings of social exclusion in men, but not women. Furthermore, positive health comparisons were weakly associated with decreased feelings of social exclusion in men. The association between negative as well as positive health comparisons and social exclusion in men was significantly moderated by self-efficacy.

Conclusions

The findings of the present study suggests that negative health comparisons are associated with feelings of social exclusion in men. In conclusion, comparison effects are not symmetric and predominantly upwards among men in the second half of life. Strengthening self-efficacy might be fruitful for attenuating this relationship.
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2017

Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 1/2017 Zur Ausgabe