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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

Self-efficacy regarding physical activity is superior to self-assessed activity level, in long-term prediction of cardiovascular events in middle-aged men

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Göran Bergström, Mats Börjesson, Caroline Schmidt
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

GB has made contributions to the analysis, interpretation, and drafting of the manuscript and has given final approval and has agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. MB has made contributions to drafting the manuscript and has given final approval and has agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. CS has made contributions to data acquisition, analysis, interpretation, and drafting the manuscript and has given final approval and has agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Authors’ information

GB is professor in Cardiovascular Research at the Institution of Medicine, Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
MB is professor in Public Health - physical activity at the Swedish School of Sports and Health Sciences.
CS is Associate Professor in Cardiovascular Prevention at the Institution of Medicine, Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

Background

Self-efficacy has been determined to be a strong predictor of who will engage in physical activity. We aimed to evaluate the associations between self-efficacy to perform physical activity, self-reported leisure-time physical activity and cardiovascular events in a population-based cohort of middle-aged Swedish men with no previous cardiovascular disease, or treatment with cardiovascular drugs.

Methods

Analyses are based on 377 men randomly selected and stratified for weight and insulin sensitivity from a population sample of 58-year-old men (n = 1728) and who had answered a question about their competence to perform exercise (as an assessment of physical self-efficacy). The Saltin-Grimby Physical Activity Level Scale was used to assess self-reported levels of leisure-time physical activity. Cardiovascular events were recorded during 13-years of follow-up.

Results

The group with poor self-efficacy to perform physical activity had a significantly higher incidence of cardiovascular events compared with the group with good physical self-efficacy (32.1 % vs 17.1 %, p < 0.01). Multivariate analyses showed that poor physical self-efficacy was associated with an increased relative risk of 2.0 (95 % CI 1.2 to 3.0), of having a cardiovascular event during follow-up also after adjustments for co-variates such as waist to hip ratio, heart rate, fasting plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, apoB/apoA-I ratio and leisure-time physical activity.

Conclusion

Self-efficacy to perform physical activity was strongly and independently associated with cardiovascular events and was superior to self-assessed physical activity in predicting cardiovascular events during 13-years of follow-up in a group of middle-aged men, without known CVD or treatment with cardiovascular drugs.
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