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Erschienen in: Brain Structure and Function 9/2023

10.09.2023 | Original Article

Social isolation leads to mild social recognition impairment and losses in brain cellularity

verfasst von: Daniel Menezes Guimarães, Bruna Valério-Gomes, Rodrigo Jorge Vianna-Barbosa, Washington Oliveira, Gilda Ângela Neves, Fernanda Tovar-Moll, Roberto Lent

Erschienen in: Brain Structure and Function | Ausgabe 9/2023

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Abstract

Chronic social stress is a significant risk factor for several neuropsychiatric disorders, mainly major depressive disorder (MDD). In this way, patients with clinical depression may display many symptoms, including disrupted social behavior and anxiety. However, like many other psychiatric diseases, MDD has a very complex etiology and pathophysiology. Because social isolation is one of the multiple depression-inducing factors in humans, this study aims to understand better the link between social stress and MDD using an animal model based on social isolation after weaning, which is known to produce social stress in mice. We focused on cellular composition and white matter integrity to establish possible links with the abnormal social behavior that rodents isolated after weaning displayed in the three-chamber social approach and recognition tests. We used the isotropic fractionator method to assess brain cellularity, which allows us to robustly estimate the number of oligodendrocytes and neurons in dissected brain regions. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was employed to analyze white matter microstructure. Results have shown that post-weaning social isolation impairs social recognition and reduces the number of neurons and oligodendrocytes in important brain regions involved in social behavior, such as the anterior neocortex and the olfactory bulb. Despite the limitations of animal models of psychological traits, evidence suggests that behavioral impairments observed in patients might have similar biological underpinnings.
Literatur
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Metadaten
Titel
Social isolation leads to mild social recognition impairment and losses in brain cellularity
verfasst von
Daniel Menezes Guimarães
Bruna Valério-Gomes
Rodrigo Jorge Vianna-Barbosa
Washington Oliveira
Gilda Ângela Neves
Fernanda Tovar-Moll
Roberto Lent
Publikationsdatum
10.09.2023
Verlag
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Erschienen in
Brain Structure and Function / Ausgabe 9/2023
Print ISSN: 1863-2653
Elektronische ISSN: 1863-2661
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00429-023-02705-z

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