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01.03.2018 | Original Paper | Ausgabe 3/2018

AIDS and Behavior 3/2018

Substance Use, Violence, and Antiretroviral Adherence: A Latent Class Analysis of Women Living with HIV in Canada

Zeitschrift:
AIDS and Behavior > Ausgabe 3/2018
Autoren:
Allison Carter, Eric Abella Roth, Erin Ding, M-J Milloy, Mary Kestler, Shahab Jabbari, Kath Webster, Alexandra de Pokomandy, Mona Loutfy, Angela Kaida, Behalf of the CHIWOS Research Team
Wichtige Hinweise
Additional research team members and affiliated institutions are listed below in Appendix.

Abstract

We used latent class analysis to identify substance use patterns for 1363 women living with HIV in Canada and assessed associations with socio-economic marginalization, violence, and sub-optimal adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). A six-class model was identified consisting of: abstainers (26.3%), Tobacco Users (8.81%), Alcohol Users (31.9%), ‘Socially Acceptable’ Poly-substance Users (13.9%), Illicit Poly-substance Users (9.81%) and Illicit Poly-substance Users of All Types (9.27%). Multinomial logistic regression showed that women experiencing recent violence had significantly higher odds of membership in all substance use latent classes, relative to Abstainers, while those reporting sub-optimal cART adherence had higher odds of being members of the poly-substance use classes only. Factors significantly associated with Illicit Poly-substance Users of All Types were sexual minority status, lower income, and lower resiliency. Findings underline a need for increased social and structural supports for women who use substances to support them in leading safe and healthy lives with HIV.

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