Skip to main content
main-content

22.01.2019 | How I Do it - Pediatric Neurosurgery | Ausgabe 2/2019

Acta Neurochirurgica 2/2019

Syringo-subarachnoid shunt: how I do it

Zeitschrift:
Acta Neurochirurgica > Ausgabe 2/2019
Autoren:
Jehuda Soleman, Jonathan Roth, Shlomi Constantini
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s00701-019-03810-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
This article is part of the Topical Collection on Pediatric Neurosurgery

Key points

- The main indication of SSS is persistent, progressing, recurrent, or newly developed syringomyelia after FMD decompression for Chiari I malformation.
- Before indicating SSS surgery, hydrocephalus, regrowth of the posterior fossa bone (especially in young children), scoliosis, tethered cord syndrome, spinal cord tumors, and spinal instability should be ruled out.
- Microsurgical technique, accompanied by neuromonitoring are imperative as they help preserve neurological function.
- The identification of the posterior midline (posterior median sulcus) of the SC is essential, in order to avoid damage to the ascending columns of the posterior SC.
- Small pial arteries fold medially towards the posterior median sulcus, aiding the surgeon in identifying the midline.
- The syrinx is best reached through a blunt dissection of the SC posterior midline using a plated bayonet, so that the surrounding neuronal structures are minimally affected.
- As an alternative, if the syringomyelia is bulging laterally, it can be approached through the DREZ.
- The shunt catheter is inserted 2–3 cm into the syrinx cavity and subarachnoid space rostrally and cranially, respectively.
- The shunt catheter has to be long enough (at least 4 cm) and must be sutured to the arachnoid, to lower the risk of shunt dislocation.
- The goal of surgery is to release pressure from the SC and prevent further neurological deterioration.

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

Background

Syringo-subarachnoid shunt (SSS) is a valid method for the treatment of syringomyelia persisting after foramen magnum decompression (FMD) for Chiari I malformation.

Method

We give a brief overview on indication and outcome of SSS, followed by a detailed description of the surgical anatomy, and of the microsurgical technique. In particular, we highlight some key points for complication avoidance.

Conclusion

SSS is a valid option to treat syringomyelia, since in experienced hands, the outcome is good in most patients, including those with holocord syringomyelia. Careful understanding of anatomy and spinal cord physiology is required to minimize complications.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

★ PREMIUM-INHALT
e.Med Interdisziplinär

Mit e.Med Interdisziplinär erhalten Sie Zugang zu allen CME-Fortbildungen und Fachzeitschriften auf SpringerMedizin.de. Zusätzlich können Sie eine Zeitschrift Ihrer Wahl in gedruckter Form beziehen – ohne Aufpreis.

Weitere Produktempfehlungen anzeigen
Zusatzmaterial
ESM 1
Video showing the surgical technique of syringo-subarachnoid shunt insertion. (MP4 256145 kb)
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 2/2019

Acta Neurochirurgica 2/2019 Zur Ausgabe
  1. Sie können e.Med Neurologie & Psychiatrie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  2. Sie können e.Med Neurologie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  3. Sie können e.Med Chirurgie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

Neu im Fachgebiet Chirurgie

Mail Icon II Newsletter

Bestellen Sie unseren kostenlosen Newsletter Update Chirurgie und bleiben Sie gut informiert – ganz bequem per eMail.

Bildnachweise