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01.12.2012 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

BMC Health Services Research 1/2012

The effects of oral clefts on hospital use throughout the lifespan

Zeitschrift:
BMC Health Services Research > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
George L Wehby, Dorthe Almind Pedersen, Jeffrey C Murray, Kaare Christensen
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1472-6963-12-58) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they do not have any financial or other competing interests in this work.

Authors' contributions

Drs. Wehby, Christensen, and Murray conceived the study. Dr. Wehby designed the study models and statistical analysis in collaboration with all co-authors. Mrs. Almind Pedersen implemented the statistical analysis. Dr. Wehby wrote the first draft. All co-authors contributed significantly to writing and critically revising the manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects worldwide. They require multiple healthcare interventions and add significant burden on the health and quality of life of affected individuals. However, not much is known about the long term effects of oral clefts on health and healthcare use of affected individuals. In this study, we evaluate the effects of oral clefts on hospital use throughout the lifespan.

Methods

We estimate two-part regression models for hospital admission and length of stay for several age groups up to 68 years of age. The study employs unique secondary population-based data from several administrative inpatient, civil registration, demographic and labor market databases for 7,670 individuals born with oral clefts between 1936 and 2002 in Denmark, and 220,113 individuals without oral clefts from a 5% random sample of the total birth population from 1936 to 2002.

Results

Oral clefts significantly increase hospital use for most ages below 60 years by up to 233% for children ages 0-10 years and 16% for middle age adults. The more severe cleft forms (cleft lip with palate) have significantly larger effects on hospitalizations than less severe forms.

Conclusions

The results suggest that individuals with oral clefts have higher hospitalization risks than the general population throughout most of the lifespan.
Zusatzmaterial
Additional file 1: Table S1. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 0-9 years. (DOC 98 KB)
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Additional file 2: Table S2. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 10-19 years. (DOC 101 KB)
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Additional file 3: Table S3. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 20-29 years. (DOC 92 KB)
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Additional file 4: Table S4. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 30-39 years. (DOC 92 KB)
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Additional file 5: Table S5. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 40-49 years. (DOC 92 KB)
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Additional file 6: Table S6. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 50-59 years. (DOC 92 KB)
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Additional file 7: Table S7. Detailed Logistic and Poisson Regression Results for Age Group 60-68 years. (DOC 92 KB)
12913_2011_1983_MOESM7_ESM.DOC
Authors’ original file for figure 1
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Authors’ original file for figure 2
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Authors’ original file for figure 3
12913_2011_1983_MOESM10_ESM.pdf
Literatur
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