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30.06.2017 | Original Contributions | Ausgabe 1/2018

Obesity Surgery 1/2018

The Inequity of Bariatric Surgery: Publicly Insured Patients Undergo Lower Rates of Bariatric Surgery with Worse Outcomes

Zeitschrift:
Obesity Surgery > Ausgabe 1/2018
Autoren:
Dietric L. Hennings, Maria Baimas-George, Zaid Al-Quarayshi, Rachel Moore, Emad Kandil, Christopher G. DuCoin
Wichtige Hinweise
Study Importance
What Is Known:
• The economic burden of obesity is well documented with substantial disparities in healthcare costs between moderate and severe obesity.
• A negative relationship exists between socioeconomic status and income with BMI.
• Bariatric surgery is not an accessible or viable option for all patients even if deemed medically suitable and optimized for surgery.
Study Adds:
• Publicly insured patients are significantly less likely to undergo bariatric surgery.
• Publicly insured patients experience higher rates of obesity and related complications and thus are most in need of bariatric surgery.
• Self-pay insurance status decreased the risk of postoperative complications after bariatric surgery.

Abstract

Objective

Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective method of achieving weight loss and alleviating obesity-related comorbidities. Yet, it is not being used equitably. This study seeks to identify if there is a disparity in payer status of patients undergoing bariatric surgery and what factors are associated with this disparity.

Methods

We performed a case-control analysis of National Inpatient Sample. We identified adults with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 who underwent bariatric surgery and matched them with overweight inpatient adult controls not undergoing surgery. The sample was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression.

Results

We identified 132,342 cases, in which the majority had private insurance (72.8%). Bariatric patients were significantly more likely to be privately insured than any other payer status; Medicare- and Medicaid-covered patients accounted for a low percentage of cases (Medicare 5.1%, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.29–0.37, p < 0.001; Medicaid 8.7%, OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.18–0.25, p < 0.001). Medicare (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.33–1.78, p < 0.001) and Medicaid (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.08–1.60, p = 0.007) patients undergoing bariatric surgery had an increased risk of complications compared to privately insured patients.

Conclusions

Publicly insured patients are significantly less likely to undergo bariatric surgery. As a group, these patients experience higher rates of obesity and related complications and thus are most in need of bariatric surgery.

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