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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2016 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2016

The intersection of health and wealth: association between personal bankruptcy and myocardial infarction rates in Canada

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2016
Autoren:
Anamaria Savu, Donald Schopflocher, Barry Scholnick, Padma Kaul
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interest

Dr. Scholnick has worked as a Research Fellow as well as a contractor for the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB), Industry Canada, Government of Canada over the last five years. OSB is the government regulator for all bankruptcies in Canada. All of his work involved the analysis of raw data, with the aim of publication. Drs. Savu, Schopflocher and Kaul have no conflict of interest to declare.

Authors’ contributions

AS participated in the design and coordination of the study, carried the statistical analysis and wrote the manuscript. DS conceived of the study, and participated in its design and coordination and helped to draft the manuscript. BS participated in the design and coordination of the study and helped to draft the manuscript. PK conceived of the study, and participated in its design and coordination and helped to draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

We examined the association between personal bankruptcy filing and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rates in Canada.

Methods

Between 2002 and 2009, aggregate and yearly bankruptcy and AMI rates were estimated for 1,155 forward sortation areas of Canada. Scatter plot and correlations were used to assess the association of the aggregate rates. Cross-lagged structural equation models were used to explore the longitudinal relationship between bankruptcy and AMI after adjustment for socio-economic factors.

Results

A cross-lagged structural equation model estimated that on average, an increase of 100 in bankruptcy filing count is associated with an increase of 1.5 (p = 0.02) in AMI count in the following year, and an increase of 100 in AMI count is associated with an increase of 7 (p < 0.01) in bankruptcy filing count.

Conclusions

We found that regions with higher rates of AMI corresponded to those with higher levels of economic and financial stress, as indicated by personal bankruptcy rate, and vice-versa.
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