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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 1/2015

The potential role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and soluble receptors for AGEs (sRAGE) in the pathogenesis of adult-onset still’s disease

Zeitschrift:
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Der-Yuan Chen, Yi-Ming Chen, Chi-Chen Lin, Chia-Wei Hsieh, Yen-Ching Wu, Wei-Ting Hung, Hsin-Hua Chen, Joung-Liang Lan
Wichtige Hinweise
Yi-Ming Chen, Chi-Chen Lin and Chia-Wei Hsieh contributed equally to this work.

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

All authors made substantive intellectual contributions to the present study and approved the final manuscript. D-YC conceived of the study, generated the original hypothesis, designed the study, acquired clinical data, conducted data analysis, and drafted and revised the manuscript. Y-MC, C-CL, and C-WH acquired clinical data, performed data analysis, and revised the manuscript. Y-CW conducted the experiment, performed data analysis, and drafted the manuscript. W-TH, H-HC, and J-LL performed clinical assessments of the study subjects, acquired clinical data, and revised the manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Accumulating evidence has demonstrated a pathogenic role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in inflammation. Soluble RAGE (sRAGE), with the same ligands-binding capacity as full-length RAGE, acts as a “decoy” receptor. However, there has been scanty data regarding AGEs and sRAGE in adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). This study aimed to investigate AGEs and sRAGE levels in AOSD patients and examine their association with clinical characteristics.

Methods

Using ELISA, plasma levels of AGEs and sRAGE were determined in 52 AOSD patients, 36 systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) patients and 16 healthy controls(HC). Their associations with activity parameters and disease courses were evaluated.

Results

Significantly higher median levels of AGEs were observed in active AOSD patients (16.75 pg/ml) and active SLE patients (14.80 pg/ml) than those in HC (9.80 pg/ml, both p < 0.001). AGEs levels were positively correlated with activity scores (r = 0.836, p < 0.001), ferritin levels (r = 0.372, p < 0.05) and CRP levels (r = 0.396, p < 0.005) in AOSD patients. Conversely, significantly lower median levels of sRAGE were observed in active AOSD patients (632.2 pg/ml) and active SLE patients (771.6 pg/ml) compared with HC (1051.7 pg/ml, both p < 0.001). Plasma sRAGE levels were negatively correlated with AOSD activity scores (r = −0.320, p < 0.05). In comparison to AOSD patients with monocyclic pattern, significantly higher AGEs levels were observed in those with polycyclic or chronic articular pattern. With treatment, AGEs levels declined while sRAGE levels increased in parallel with the decrease in disease activity.

Conclusion

The elevation of AGEs levels with concomitant decreased sRAGE levels in active AOSD patients, suggests their pathogenic role in AOSD.
Literatur
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