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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Public Health 1/2015

The role of men in abandonment of female genital mutilation: a systematic review

Zeitschrift:
BMC Public Health > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Nesrin Varol, Sabera Turkmani, Kirsten Black, John Hall, Angela Dawson
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

NV and AD conceived the idea of the study. The systematic search of the peer-reviewed research was undertaken by AD. NV and AD undertook evaluation of the identified research. NV, AD, ST and KB summarised the available data. NV drafted the manuscript and AD, ST, KB and JH finalised the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Men in their roles as fathers, husbands, community and religious leaders may play a pivotal part in the continuation of female genital mutilation (FGM). However, the research on their views of FGM and their potential role in its abandonment are not well described.

Methods

We undertook a systematic review of all publications between 2004 and 2014 that explored men’s attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours in regards to FGM, as well as their ideas about FGM prevention and abandonment.

Results

We included twenty peer-reviewed articles from 15 countries in the analysis. Analysis revealed ambiguity of men’s wishes in regards to the continuation of FGM. Many men wished to abandon this practice because of the physical and psychosexual complications to both women and men. Social obligation and the silent culture between the sexes were posited as major obstacles for change. Support for abandonment was influenced by notions of social obligation, religion, education, ethnicity, urban living, migration, and understanding of the negative sequelae of FGM. The strongest influence was education.

Conclusion

The level of education of men was one of the most important indicators for men’s support for abandonment of FGM. Social obligation and the lack of dialogue between men and women were two key issues that men acknowledged as barriers to abandonment. Advocacy by men and collaboration between men and women’s health and community programs may be important steps forward in the abandonment process.
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