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01.12.2011 | Erectile Dysfunction (Thomas Lue, Section Editor) | Ausgabe 6/2011

Current Urology Reports 6/2011

Treatment of Peyronie’s Disease: 2012 Update

Zeitschrift:
Current Urology Reports > Ausgabe 6/2011
Autoren:
Ege Can Serefoglu, Wayne J. G. Hellstrom

Abstract

Peyronie’s disease (PD) is the occurrence of a fibrous inelastic scar of the tunica albuginea of the penis. It is a relatively common disorder among men, with a reported prevalence of 3% to 8%. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect state, and difficulty with intromission. Because the exact pathophysiology of PD remains unknown and standards for evaluating or reporting treatment outcomes are unclear, research on effective therapies has been limited. The benefits of nonsurgical treatment options are conflicting and further controlled studies are required before any therapy can be fully recommended. The success of surgery has been well documented; however, surgery is invasive and costly and carries potential side effects. Patients who report stable disease that has been present for longer than 12 months and who experience penile deformity preventing satisfactory sexual intercourse are best suited for surgery. Additionally, failed conservative management and a patient’s preference for definitive correction are important additional indications for surgical treatment.

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