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01.12.2012 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

BMC International Health and Human Rights 1/2012

Treatment patterns of childhood diarrhoea in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional survey

Zeitschrift:
BMC International Health and Human Rights > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Jenny Löfgren, Wenjing Tao, Elin Larsson, Francis Kyakulaga, Birger C Forsberg
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

JL designed the study along with co-authors, performed the data collection, analysed data and wrote the manuscript. WT participated in the data collection and study design. EL contributed to the study design and data analysis. FK supervised the data collection and contributed to the study design. BF initiated the study and supervised all parts of it, including study design, data analysis and manuscript editing. All authors commented on the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Diarrhoea is the second leading cause of death in children under five accounting for 1.8 million deaths yearly. Despite global efforts to reduce diarrhoea mortality through promotion of proper case management, there is still room for ample improvement. In order to seek options for such improvements this study explored the knowledge and practices of diarrhoea case management among health care providers at health centres and drug shops in Uganda.

Methods

Records were reviewed for case management and structured interviews concerning knowledge and practices were conducted with the staff at all health centres and at all identified drug shops in the rural district of Namutumba, Uganda.

Results

There was a significant gap between knowledge and documented practices among staff. Antibiotics, antimalarials and antipyretics were prescribed or recommended as frequently as Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS). In almost a third of the health facilities, ORS was out of stock. 81% of staff in health centres and 87% of staff in drug shops stated that they prescribed antibiotics for common diarrhoea. Zinc was not prescribed or recommended in any case.

Conclusions

The findings indicate that many children presenting with diarrhoea are inadequately treated. As a result they may not get the rehydration they need and are at risk of potential side effects from unjustified usage of antibiotics. Practices must be improved at health centres and drug shops in order to reduce childhood mortality due to diarrhoeal diseases.
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