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01.12.2012 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2012 Open Access

International Journal for Equity in Health 1/2012

Gender (in)equality among employees in elder care: implications for health

Zeitschrift:
International Journal for Equity in Health > Ausgabe 1/2012
Autoren:
Sofia Elwér, Lena Aléx, Anne Hammarström
Wichtige Hinweise

Competing interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors' contributions

All authors participated in the design of the study. SE and LA performed the data collection as moderator (SE) and assisting moderator (LA) of the focus group discussions. All authors contributed to the analysis of the data. SE drafted the manuscript and AH and LA critically revised the intellectual content of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Introduction

Gendered practices of working life create gender inequalities through horizontal and vertical gender segregation in work, which may lead to inequalities in health between women and men. Gender equality could therefore be a key element of health equity in working life. Our aim was to analyze what gender (in)equality means for the employees at a woman-dominated workplace and discuss possible implications for health experiences.

Methods

All caregiving staff at two workplaces in elder care within a municipality in the north of Sweden were invited to participate in the study. Forty-five employees participated, 38 women and 7 men. Seven focus group discussions were performed and led by a moderator. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the focus groups.

Results

We identified two themes. "Advocating gender equality in principle" showed how gender (in)equality was seen as a structural issue not connected to the individual health experiences. "Justifying inequality with individualism" showed how the caregivers focused on personalities and interests as a justification of gender inequalities in work division. The justification of gender inequality resulted in a gendered work division which may be related to health inequalities between women and men. Gender inequalities in work division were primarily understood in terms of personality and interests and not in terms of gender.

Conclusion

The health experience of the participants was affected by gender (in)equality in terms of a gendered work division. However, the participants did not see the gendered work division as a gender equality issue. Gender perspectives are needed to improve the health of the employees at the workplaces through shifting from individual to structural solutions. A healthy-setting approach considering gender relations is needed to achieve gender equality and fairness in health status between women and men.
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