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01.12.2019 | Original Research | Ausgabe 1/2019 Open Access

International Journal of Emergency Medicine 1/2019

The influence of past experiences on future willingness to perform bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Zeitschrift:
International Journal of Emergency Medicine > Ausgabe 1/2019
Autoren:
Keng Sheng Chew, Shazrina Ahmad Razali, Shirly Siew Ling Wong, Aisyah Azizul, Nurul Faizah Ismail, Sharoon Juliet Kun Chyee Ak Robert, Yegharaj A/L Jayaveeran
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Abstract

Background

The influence of past familial experiences of receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and medical help in various cardiac arrest and nonfatal cardiac events toward willingness to “pay it forward” by helping the next cardiac arrest victim was explored.

Methods

Using a validated questionnaire, 6248 participants were asked to rate their willingness to perform bystander chest compression with mouth-to-mouth ventilation and chest compression-only CPR. Their past familial experiences of receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and medical help in various cardiac arrest and nonfatal cardiac events were also recorded.

Results

Kruskal-Wallis test with post hoc Dunn’s pairwise comparisons showed that the following were significantly more willing to perform CPR with mouth-to-mouth ventilation: familial experience of “nonfatal cardiac events” (mean rank = 447) vs “out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with no CPR” (mean rank = 177), U = 35442.5, z = −2.055, p = 0.04; “in-hospital cardiac arrest and successful CPR” (mean rank = 2955.79) vs “none of these experiences” (mean rank = 2468.38), U = 111903, z = −2.60, p = 0.01; and “in-hospital cardiac arrest with successful CPR” (mean rank = 133.45) vs “out-of-hospital arrest with no CPR” (mean rank = 112.36), U = 4135.5, z = −2.06, p = 0.04. For compression-only CPR, Kruskal-Wallis test with multiple runs of Mann-Whitney U tests showed that “nonfatal cardiac events” group was statistically higher than the group with “none of these experiences” (mean rank = 3061.43 vs 2859.91), U = 1194658, z = −2.588, p = 0.01. The groups of “in-hospital cardiac arrest with successful CPR” and “in-hospital cardiac arrest with transient return of spontaneous circulation” were the most willing groups to perform compression-only CPR.

Conclusion

Prior familial experiences of receiving CPR and medical help, particularly among those with successful outcomes in a hospital setting, seem to increase the willingness to perform bystander CPR.
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