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29.11.2018 | Original Paper

Work Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Migrant Workers: The Moderating Role of Community Factors

Zeitschrift:
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Autoren:
Wanlian Li, Fei Sun, Yanling Li, Daniel W. Durkin
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10903-018-0843-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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Abstract

This study aimed to examine depressive symptoms in ruralurban migrant workers in mainland China, with a focus on the moderating roles of community factors (i.e., community support network, community cohesion and community composition) in the relation between work stress and depressive symptoms. This study used secondary data from a national representative study conducted by the Social Survey Center at SUN-YETSEN University of China in 2014. The final sample contained 1434 participants from 29 provinces of China (Mean age = 36.47, SD = 11.91). Being female, lower self-rated health, lower levels of self-rated class, lower levels of community cohesion and higher work stress were related to higher depressive symptoms. Community cohesion was found to lessen the migrant workers depressive symptoms but was not identified as a moderator for work stress and depressive symptoms. Community supportive networks moderated the relation between work stress and depressive symptoms. Rural–urban migrant workers in China experienced high work stress and high depressive symptoms. Public health policies or programs should help expand and strengthen migrant workers’ supportive network size, and facilitate the creation of community cohesion to lessen depressive symptoms.

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Zusatzmaterial
Supplementary material 1 (SAV 32899 KB)
10903_2018_843_MOESM1_ESM.sav
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