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01.12.2015 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2015 Open Access

BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 1/2015

Dynamic Intraligamentary Stabilization (DIS) for treatment of acute anterior cruciate ligament ruptures: case series experience of the first three years

Zeitschrift:
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders > Ausgabe 1/2015
Autoren:
Philipp Henle, Christoph Röder, Gosia Perler, Sven Heitkemper, Stefan Eggli
Wichtige Hinweise
Philipp Henle and Christoph Röder contributed equally to this work.

Competing interests

PH, CR, and SE have received reimbursements or funding from Mathys AG Bettlach, Switzerland, in the past five years. The manuscript fee was also covered by the company.

Authors’ contributions

PH has operated many of the cases, composed the manuscript concept and co-written the manuscript. CR has taken a leading role in developing and implementing the Ligamys™ data collection system and content, planning and supervising data analysis, and co-writing the manuscript. GP has conducted all statistical analyses for the manuscript SH has operated some of the cases and helped editing the final draft version of the manuscript. SE has developed Ligamys™, operated many cases and supervised the complete study as well as edited the complete manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

In recent years, the scientific discussion has focused on new strategies to enable a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) to heal into mechanically stable scar tissue. Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) was first performed in a pilot study of 10 patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether DIS would lead to similarly sufficient stability and good clinical function in a larger case series.

Methods

Acute ACL ruptures were treated by using an internal stabilizer, combined with anatomical repositioning of torn bundles and microfracturing to promote self-healing. Clinical assessment (Tegner, Lysholm, IKDC, and visual analogue scale [VAS] for patient satisfaction scores) and assessment of knee laxity was performed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. A one-sample design with a non-inferiority margin was chosen to compare the preoperative and postoperative IKDS and Lysholm scores.

Results

278 patients with a 6:4 male to female ratio were included. Average patient age was 31 years. Preoperative mean IKDC, Lysholm, and Tegner scores were 98.8, 99.3, and 5.1 points, respectively. The mean anteroposterior (AP) translation difference from the healthy contralateral knee was 4.7 mm preoperatively. After DIS treatment, the mean 12-month IKDC, Lysholm, and Tegner scores were 93.6, 96.2, and 4.9 points, respectively, and the mean AP translation difference was 2.3 mm. All these outcomes were significantly non-inferior to the preoperative or healthy contralateral values (p < 0.0001). Mean patient satisfaction was 8.8 (VAS 0–10). Eight ACL reruptures occurred and 3 patients reported insufficient subjective stability of the knee at the end of the study period.

Conclusions

Anatomical repositioning, along with DIS and microfracturing, leads to clinically stable healing of the torn ACL in the large majority of patients. Most patients exhibited almost normal knee function, reported excellent satisfaction, and were able to return to their previous levels of sporting activity. Moreover, this strategy resulted in stable healing of all sutured menisci, which could lower the rate of osteoarthritic changes in future. The present findings support the discussion of a new paradigm in ACL treatment based on preservation and self-healing of the torn ligament.
Literatur
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