Skip to main content
main-content

01.12.2014 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2014 Open Access

Patient Safety in Surgery 1/2014

Incidence of perioperative sleep-disordered breathing in patients undergoing major surgery: a prospective cohort study

Zeitschrift:
Patient Safety in Surgery > Ausgabe 1/2014
Autoren:
Jens Roggenbach, Patrick Saur, Stefan Hofer, Thomas Bruckner, Michael Preusch, Remo Carbone, Andreas Walther
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1754-9493-8-13) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

The authors specifically do not have any financial conflict of interest related to the sponsor of this study, Heinen + Löwenstein, Bad Ems, Germany. The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors’ contributions

JR: study design, data acquisition and analysis, drafted the article. PS: Critical revision for intellectual content, final approval of the article. SH: Study design, critical revision of the article, final approval of the article. TB: Analysis and data interpretation, final approval of the article. MP: Critical revision for intellectual content, final approval of the article. RC: Acquisition of data, analyzed and interpreted data, final approval of the article. AW: Contributed to concept and design, final approval of the article.

Abstract

Background

Major surgery might have a modulating effect on nocturnal breathing patterns. The incidence and course of perioperative sleep-disordered breathing in individuals without a previous diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea has not been investigated sufficiently so far.

Methods

In this study, polygraphic recordings have been obtained from 37 inpatients without a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome during the preoperative night before and six nights following major surgical procedures.
Eligible patients consenting to participate in this study underwent polygraphic recordings including four items (O2-saturation, pulse, nasal air flow and snoring) during the study period. Polygraphic data obtained from the postoperative recordings were compared to preoperative recordings.

Results

Median (IQR [range]) apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI) for the whole group was 6,0 (2,5 - 14,7 [0–32,6]) in the preoperative night and increased in the following six nights post surgery: second night: 5,6 (2,6-15,0 [1,1 - 59,3]); third night: 16,9 (5,6 - 38,8 [2,9 - 64,3]); fourth night: 11,6 (5,9 - 17,3 [0,4 - 39,3]); fifth night: 15,2 (5,7 - 22,2 [0,2 - 55,5]); sixth night: 22,5 (5,2 - 35,4 [0,2 - 67,7]). AHI-scores of the third to sixth night post surgery differed significantly from data observed in the preoperative night.

Conclusion

A significant increase in the AHI occurred frequently after major surgical procedures in the late postoperative period. Sleep-disordered breathings in the late postoperative period deserve attention, as they potentially increase the risk of postoperative complications.
Zusatzmaterial
Authors’ original file for figure 1
13037_2013_223_MOESM1_ESM.tiff
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2014

Patient Safety in Surgery 1/2014 Zur Ausgabe

Neu im Fachgebiet Chirurgie

Mail Icon II Newsletter

Bestellen Sie unseren kostenlosen Newsletter Update Chirurgie und bleiben Sie gut informiert – ganz bequem per eMail.

Bildnachweise