Skip to main content
main-content

01.12.2014 | Research article | Ausgabe 1/2014 Open Access

BMC Family Practice 1/2014

Practice nurse involvement in primary care depression management: an observational cost-effectiveness analysis

Zeitschrift:
BMC Family Practice > Ausgabe 1/2014
Autoren:
Jodi Gray, Hossein Haji Ali Afzali, Justin Beilby, Christine Holton, David Banham, Jonathan Karnon
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​1471-2296-15-10) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Competing interests

There are no known competing interests for any of the authors in relation to the work presented in this paper.

Authors’ contributions

All authors contributed to study design, interpretation of results and drafting of manuscript. In addition: JK was responsible for study conception and organisation; JG performed data extraction; HH conducted the classification of model of care; HH and JG designed the classification framework and performed depression state classification; JG performed the statistical analysis, advised by JK and HH; JG completed the first draft of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Background

Most evidence on the effect of collaborative care for depression is derived in the selective environment of randomised controlled trials. In collaborative care, practice nurses may act as case managers. The Primary Care Services Improvement Project (PCSIP) aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative models of practice nurse involvement in a real world Australian setting. Previous analyses have demonstrated the value of high level practice nurse involvement in the management of diabetes and obesity. This paper reports on their value in the management of depression.

Methods

General practices were assigned to a low or high model of care based on observed levels of practice nurse involvement in clinical-based activities for the management of depression (i.e. percentage of depression patients seen, percentage of consultation time spent on clinical-based activities). Linked, routinely collected data was used to determine patient level depression outcomes (proportion of depression-free days) and health service usage costs. Standardised depression assessment tools were not routinely used, therefore a classification framework to determine the patient’s depressive state was developed using proxy measures (e.g. symptoms, medications, referrals, hospitalisations and suicide attempts). Regression analyses of costs and depression outcomes were conducted, using propensity weighting to control for potential confounders.

Results

Capacity to determine depressive state using the classification framework was dependent upon the level of detail provided in medical records. While antidepressant medication prescriptions were a strong indicator of depressive state, they could not be relied upon as the sole measure. Propensity score weighted analyses of total depression-related costs and depression outcomes, found that the high level model of care cost more (95% CI: -$314.76 to $584) and resulted in 5% less depression-free days (95% CI: -0.15 to 0.05), compared to the low level model. However, this result was highly uncertain, as shown by the confidence intervals.

Conclusions

Classification of patients’ depressive state was feasible, but time consuming, using the classification framework proposed. Further validation of the framework is required. Unlike the analyses of diabetes and obesity management, no significant differences in the proportion of depression-free days or health service costs were found between the alternative levels of practice nurse involvement.
Zusatzmaterial
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2014

BMC Family Practice 1/2014 Zur Ausgabe

Neu im Fachgebiet Allgemeinmedizin

Meistgelesene Bücher aus dem Fachgebiet

2018 | Buch

Repetitorium Geriatrie

Geriatrische Grundversorgung - Zusatz-Weiterbildung Geriatrie - Schwerpunktbezeichnung Geriatrie

Das vorliegende Werk orientiert sich an den Fort-bzw. Weiterbildungsinhalten der Zusatz-Weiterbildung „Geriatrie“ , der Schwerpunktbezeichnung „Geriatrie“ sowie der strukturierten curricularen Fortbildung „Geriatrische Grundversorgung“ und wendet …

Herausgeber:
Dr. Rainer Neubart

2012 | Buch

Häufige Hautkrankheiten in der Allgemeinmedizin

Klinik Diagnose Therapie

Patienten mit Hautkrankheiten machen einen großen Anteil der Patienten in der Allgemeinarztpraxis aus. Prägnante Texte und zahlreiche Abbildungen zu Klinik, Pathogenese, Diagnose und Therapie helfen, die häufigsten dermatologischen Probleme zu lösen.

Autor:
Prof. Dr. med. Dietrich Abeck

Mail Icon II Newsletter

Bestellen Sie unseren kostenlosen Newsletter Update Allgemeinmedizin und bleiben Sie gut informiert – ganz bequem per eMail.

Bildnachweise