Skip to main content
main-content

13.02.2019 | Ausgabe 3/2019

Journal of NeuroVirology 3/2019

Sex differences in neurocognitive screening among adults living with HIV in China

Zeitschrift:
Journal of NeuroVirology > Ausgabe 3/2019
Autoren:
Xiaotong Qiao, Haijiang Lin, Xiaoxiao Chen, Chenxi Ning, Keran Wang, Weiwei Shen, Xiaohui Xu, Xiaoyi Xu, Xing Liu, Na He, Yingying Ding
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s13365-019-00727-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Xiaotong Qiao and Haijiang Lin contributed equally to this work.

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

HIV-infected (HIV+) women may be more vulnerable to neurocognitive impairment (NCI) due to psychological and physiological factors but previous studies show mixed findings. We investigated the neurocognitive performances in HIV+ versus HIV− women and men. This cross-sectional analysis included 669 HIV+ patients (223 women) and 1338 HIV-uninfected (HIV−) controls (446 women) which were frequency matched on sex, education, and 5-year age categories. NCI was screened using the Mini-mental State Examination. Psychomotor speed was assessed using timed alternating hand sequence test. Prevalence of NCI was higher among women versus men in the HIV+ group (16.1% vs 10.5%) but not the HIV− group (4.3% vs 3.5%). HIV+ women performed worse compared to men on psychomotor speed, orientation, attention, and calculation, whereas HIV− women performed worse compared to men on attention and calculation. Adjusted interaction effects of HIV status × sex (women vs men) were significant on orientation, attention, and calculation, and marginally significant on psychomotor speed (p = 0.053). In multivariable models, among both HIV+ women and men, less years of education and depressive symptoms were associated with NCI. Waist-to-hip ratio above the cut-off was strongly associated with NCI among HIV+ women. HIV+ women perform worse on cognitive measures compared to HIV+ men. The association of central obesity with NCI in HIV+ women should be noted.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

★ PREMIUM-INHALT
e.Med Interdisziplinär

Mit e.Med Interdisziplinär erhalten Sie Zugang zu allen CME-Fortbildungen und Fachzeitschriften auf SpringerMedizin.de.

Jetzt e.Med zum Sonderpreis bestellen!

Sichern Sie sich jetzt Ihr e.Med-Abo und sparen Sie 50 %!

Weitere Produktempfehlungen anzeigen
Zusatzmaterial
Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 3/2019

Journal of NeuroVirology 3/2019 Zur Ausgabe
  1. Sie können e.Med Innere Medizin 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  2. Sie können e.Med Neurologie & Psychiatrie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.

  3. Sie können e.Med Neurologie 14 Tage kostenlos testen (keine Print-Zeitschrift enthalten). Der Test läuft automatisch und formlos aus. Es kann nur einmal getestet werden.