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01.12.2017 | Research | Ausgabe 1/2017 Open Access

Virology Journal 1/2017

Quantitative detection of human Malawi polyomavirus in nasopharyngeal aspirates, sera, and feces in Beijing, China, using real-time TaqMan-based PCR

Zeitschrift:
Virology Journal > Ausgabe 1/2017
Autoren:
Fen-lian Ma, Dan-di Li, Tian-li Wei, Jin-song Li, Li-shu Zheng
Wichtige Hinweise

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1186/​s12985-017-0817-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Abstract

Background

Human Malawi polyomavirus (MWPyV) was discovered in 2012, but its prevalence and clinical characteristics are largely unknown.

Methods

We used real-time TaqMan-based PCR to detect MWPyV in the feces (n = 174) of children with diarrhea, nasopharyngeal aspirates (n = 887) from children with respiratory infections, and sera (n = 200) from healthy adults, and analyzed its clinical characteristics statistically. All the MWPyV-positive specimens were also screened for other common respiratory viruses.

Results

Sixteen specimens were positive for MWPyV, including 13 (1.47%) respiratory samples and three (1.7%) fecal samples. The samples were all co-infected with other respiratory viruses, most commonly with influenza viruses (69.2%) and human coronaviruses (30.7%). The MWPyV-positive children were diagnosed with bronchopneumonia or viral diarrhea. They ranged in age from 12 days to 9 years, and the most frequent symptoms were cough and fever.

Conclusions

Real-time PCR is an effective tool for the detection of MWPyV in different types of samples. MWPyV infection mainly occurs in young children, and fecal–oral transmission is a possible route of its transmission.
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